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Graduate Certificate: When Terror Reigns: Neo-Jungian Perspectives and Approaches to Archetypal Evil in Times of War and Oppression

April 20th – November 30th, 2024

14 Live Courses | Offered Live via Zoom

Program Description

What you will receive

  • 14 Live Interactive Learning Sessions with world recognized Jungian Analysts & Scholars
  • 14 Recorded Learning Sessions with world recognized Jungian Analysts & Scholars
  • A Learning Resource Guide with links to suggested books, articles, films
  • A Private, on-line Discussion Forum
  • PGI Graduate Certificate upon successful completion of the course
  • 14 CECs* See qualifying criteria for CEs below

Course Description:

“To a quite terrifying degree we are threatened by wars and revolutions which are nothing other than psychic epidemics. At any moment several millions of human beings may be smitten with a new madness, and then we shall have another world war or devastating revolution…modern man is battered by the elemental forces of his own psyche. This is the World Power that vastly exceeds all other powers on earth. The Age of Enlightenment, which stripped nature and human institutions of gods, overlooked the God of Terror who dwells in the human soul.”
C.G. Jung, CW 17, para 302

War has been a recurring feature of human history since time immemorial and according to Hillman, will remain with us “until the gods themselves go away.” Its persistent existence underscores not only a certain grim realism, but a challenge to the psychoanalytic practitioner and ordinary citizen to come to grips with the unspeakable realities of archetypal evil. Hannah Arendt in writing about the trial of Adolf Eichman, coined a term, “the banality of evil” referring to the way in which profound crimes against humanity become routinely systematized during war. Emmanuel Levinas in his book, Totality and Infinity writes that: “the state of war suspends morality.” Today, military leaders and mental health professionals are recognizing moral injury among returning vets as one of the most significant and yet, historically unacknowledged components of the trauma of war.

Jung’s portrayal of evil offers a striking tableau where “God suffers” due to humanity’s reluctance to acknowledge its darkness. Men grapple with a “suffering God” and, in a nuanced perspective, either “suffer from evil” or, perhaps more aptly put, succumb to its influence which means to undermine any sense of evil as crisis by simply denying that it means that much to us. By contrast, those who acknowledge that they are suffering from evil have accepted the complexity of their relationship to it.

This graduate certificate course, crafted in response to recent global events of war and the profound crimes against humanity that war engenders, delves into an exploration of neo-Jungian approaches to understanding and working with the archetypal manifestations of evil that war normalizes. Taught by an international cadre of Jungian scholar/practitioners, this course will ask difficult questions that go beyond projecting evil onto the other, but ask for courageous self-examination of the interwoven relationship of evil and the human psyche. The transdisciplinary design of this certificate course will also offer creative approaches for working with the unspeakable trauma that evil leaves in its wake. Each lecture will help to illuminate a deeper understanding that transcends the immediate challenges we face, with a meaningful and insightful exploration into the human psyche and its responses to the evolving tapestry of global events.

Pacifica Extension and International Studies is pleased to offer this one-of-a-kind graduate certificate course that connects you with world recognized authorities in Analytical Psychology and Neo-Jungian Studies whose individual and collective scholarship continue to shape the contours and influence the trajectory of the theory and practice of Jungian Psychoanalytic work. Working in partnership with Jungeaneum/Dr. Stefano Carpani, this graduate certificate offers you an internationally diverse exploration of Neo-Jungian theory and practices in working with archetypal evil in times of war and oppression. Each interactive learning session will focus not only on theoretical aspects of evil, terror, trauma and war, but on understanding the ways in which Jungian psychology offers insights and creative modalities for working with the unspeakable horrors that war and systemic oppression inevitably bring.

According to Homer, who portrays humans as primitive beings, war is not merely a human endeavor but a divine one, orchestrated by the Gods. Heraclitus defined war as “the father of all.” James Hillman, in his book, A Terrible Love of War, writes of war as a psychological task and an “archetypal truth of the cosmos1.” He goes on to calculate that during the 5,600 years of human history, there have been 14,600 recorded wars2. A number that is already increased with the multiple and ongoing wars of the last decade.

War has been a recurring feature of human history since time immemorial and according to Hillman, will remain with us “until the gods themselves go away.” Its persistent existence underscores not only a certain grim realism, but a challenge to the psychoanalytic practitioner and ordinary citizen to come to grips with the unspeakable realities of archetypal evil. Hannah Arendt in writing about the trial of Adolf Eichman, coined a term, “the banality of evil” referring to the way in which profound crimes against humanity become routinely systematized during war. Emmanuel Levinas in his book, Totality and Infinity writes that: “the state of war suspends morality.” Today, military leaders and mental health professionals are recognizing moral injury among returning vets as one of the most significant and yet, historically unacknowledged components of the trauma of war.

Jung’s portrayal of evil (useful to look at in the early 21st century) offers a striking tableau where “God suffers” due to humanity’s reluctance to acknowledge its darkness. Men grapple with a “suffering God” and, in a nuanced perspective, either “suffer from evil” or, perhaps more aptly put, succumb to its influence through hypocrisy, which means to undermine any sense of evil as crisis by simply denying that it means that much to us. By contrast, those who acknowledge that they are suffering from evil have accepted the complexity of their relationship to it. Instead of hypocrisy, individuals who own their relationship to evil can admit that in a way they both “love evil” and yet, paradoxically, “love it no longer.”

This graduate certificate course, crafted in response to recent global events of war and the profound crimes against humanity that war engenders, delves into an exploration of neo-Jungian approaches to understanding and working with the archetypal manifestations of evil that war normalizes. Taught by an international cadre of Jungian scholar/practitioners, this course will ask difficult questions that go beyond projecting evil onto the other, but ask for courageous self-examination of the interwoven relationship of evil and the human psyche. The transdisciplinary design of this certificate course will also offer creative approaches for working with the unspeakable trauma that evil leaves in its wake. Each lecture will help to illuminate a deeper understanding that transcends the immediate challenges we face, with a meaningful and insightful exploration into the human psyche and its responses to the evolving tapestry of global events.

This Course is ideal if:

This course is open to anyone interested in the work of C.G. Jung, the post-Jungians and Analytical Psychology as well as depth psychology who want to have a first contact with this discipline. No previous knowledge or degrees will be required to register. Lay person, Psychologists, Medical Doctors, psychotherapists, other health professionals and nurses, students, teachers and researchers of psychology, sociology and social sciences and the humanities and other professionals of arts are welcome.

By Enrolling in This Course You Will Be Able to:

  • Embark on an intellectually enriching exploration of the concept of evil within the framework of Analytical Psychology, with a specific focus on Archetypal and Complex theories.
  • Uncover the profound implications of evil, delving into its multifaceted manifestations, including Gendered Violence, Systemic Racism, Religious Shadow, and Authoritarianism/Colonialism.
  • Gain valuable insights into the clinical dimensions and pathways to healing, addressing not only the psychological aspects but also the realm of Human Rights Violations.
  • Illuminate the unconscious through transformative modalities such as Sandplay, Dreams analysis, and expressive mediums like Painting/Drawing.
  • Explore the therapeutic dimensions of Dance as Archetypal Narrative Movement and Music and delve into the profound and healing aspects of these expressive modalities.

Course Overview:

All Live Sessions will run on Saturdays from 8:00 – 9:30 AM PST/11:00 – 12:30 PM EST/4:00 – 5:30 PM London.

Each Faculty Presenter will offer:

  • One 60 minute pre-recorded presentation
  • One 90 minute live webinar/discussion/interactive learning session
  • Recommended Reading, films, etc.

John Beebe (USA) 20TH APRIL

  • Evil as an Autonomous Complex

Caterina Vezzoli (Italy) 4TH MAY

  • Evil as Abuse of The Feminine (Fear of The Feminine)

Cristopher Carter & Tiffany Houck (USA) 18TH MAY

  • Evil as Systemic Racism

Lionel Corbett (US) 15TH JUNE

  • Evil as Religious Shadow

Alan Vaughn (US) 29TH JUNE

  • Evil as Authoritarianism/Colonialism (Original Sin, Evil, and Confession: Truth and Reconciliation of the Colonial Enterprise)

Henry Abramovitch (Israel) 20TH JULY

  • Analysis in the Shadow of Terror: Clinical Aspects

Renos Papadopoulos (UK) 27TH JULY

  • Evil as Destructiveness, Atrocities and Healing: Epistemological and Clinical Reflections

Marianne Meister (CH) 7th SEPTEMBER

  • Evil and Painting/Drawing

Eva Pattis (Italy) 21st SEPTEMBER

  • Evil and Sandplay: Expressive Sandwork in contexts of war and disruption

Renate Daniels (Germany) 5th OCTOBER

  • Evil and Fairytales

Giovanna Bianchi (IT) 26th OCTOBER

  • Evil and Innocents: Working with Human Rights Violations in Clinical and Community Settings

Loralee M. Scott (USA) 2nd NOVEMBER

  • Evil and Dance/Archetypal Narrative Movement

Joel Kroeker (Canada) 16th NOVEMBER

  • Music and Evil: A Sonic Exploration Beyond The Safety of Words

Stefano Carpani (Italy) 30TH NOVEMBER

  • Evil as Reset: From the Suspension to the End of Certainties

 

John Beebe (USA) 20TH APRIL


Evil as an Autonomous Complex

Course Overview:

Attempts to formulate a psychology of evil founder on the fact that evil does not find enough ground in the psyche alone to allow a logos of its operations to emerge just from psychological analysis. Jung, in his sixties, first fell into this trap when he tried to write about Nazi evil; in his seventies he came to see that not everything he wanted his psychology to clarify could be assumed to belong to psyche simply because it felt like a psychological problem. In 1947, Jung put forward the term “psychoid” to describe what resembled psyche but was not human enough to be part of anyone’s individual or group soul. The psychoid is “-oid,” in the sense of seeming. It only appears to belong to psyche, just as a humanoid creature only appears to be human. Evil’s psychoid nature does not preclude it becoming a complex, but that does not mean that evils belong to a differentiated unitary psyche capable of figuring out evil’s meaning. As an undermining complex that attacks the psyche, evil is devoid of the capacity to organize an integrative psychological standpoint. Evil shatters the capacity of consciousness to contemplate even itself in an introspective or empathic way. Evil thrives on remaining an abstract, extra-human force. In my work with psychological types, I have observed that one of the eight function-attitudes of consciousness that Jung defined tends to claim a demonic space in each of us that is dedicated to unsettling and undermining ourselves and others. Evil functions so stealthily and devilishly as to be untranscendable by any psychological means. It is the transcendent function’s shadow, its evil twin. This section of “When Evil Reigns” will show what is added when we focus on the notorious autonomy of evil and recognize that this independence of psyche is an aspect of evil’s psychoid nature.

Learning Objectives

  1. To clarify the difference between a psychoid and an ordinary complex
  2. To show how evil undermines psyche by retaining its psychoid nature

Bibliography:

  • Addison, Ann (2009) Jung, vitalism, and ‘the Psychoid’: a historical reconstruction. Journal of Analytical Psychology, 54, pp. 123-142.
  • Ann Addison (2017) Jung’s psychoid concept: a hermeneutical understanding. International Journal of Jungian Studies, 9 (1), 1-16.
  • Harald Atmanspacher & Christopher A. Fuchs (eds.) (2014) The Pauli-Jung Conjecture and its Impact Today. Imprint Academic Exeter.
  • Beebe, John (2023) Jung’s Dream of the Arab Prince. In Individuation Psychology: Essays in Honor of Murray Stein, Steven Buser & Len Cruz, editors. Asheville, North Carolina: Chiron Publications
  • Brooks, Robin McCoy (2011) Un-thought out metaphysics in analytical psychology: a critique of Jung’s epistemological basis for psychic reality. Journal of Analytical Psychology, 56(4):492-513.
  • Corbett, Lionel (2024) Jung’s Philosophy: Controversies, Quantum Mechanics, and the Self. London: Routledge.
  • Jung, C. G. (various years from 1947 on) CW 8, paras. 368, 417, 439 ; CW 10, para. 852 ; CW 14, para. 660 Letters, vol 2, 1975, p.21-23 & p.317-319.
  • Mills, Jon (2014). Jung as philosopher: archetypes, the psychoid factor, and the question of the supernatural. International Journal of Jungian Studies, 6 (3), 227-242.

Biography: Jungian analyst John Beebe is a psychiatrist in private practice in San Francisco. Dr. Beebe has spoken on topics related to the theory and practical applications of analytical psychology in 22 countries around the world. Founding Editor of The San Francisco Jung Institute Library Journal (now titled Jung Journal: Culture and Psyche), Beebe was the first American co-editor of the Journal of Analytical Psychology. He is the author of numerous articles and book chapters and of the books, Integrity in Depth and Energies and Patterns in Psychological Type.

 

Caterina Vezzoli (Italy) 4TH MAY


Evil as Abuse of The Feminine (Fear of The Feminine)

Course Overview

The trauma of abuse runs deeply in the history of the Western world. I will use Caravaggio’s paintings to illustrate the loss of soul and how the abuse of the feminine perpetrated against women not only creates the fear of the feminine, in Neuman terms, but also alienates the possibility of encountering the Other, not as the contra-sexual other but rather the meeting with the horror that comes from being abused—the freezing of the uncanny that penetrate the psyche.

Caravaggio is the painter of the beheading of the Loss of the Soul. Often, the head is his. Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio was able to represent the moment in which the soul is lost but also Medusa’s with all the snakes around her head. He doesn’t shake in front of evil and can represent the pervasive fear of the abused.

War is, of course, the repetition of some abuse, no matter how. Even a defensive war can become a repetition of horror already inflicted. Interestingly in the history of the West, the only movements that changed the vision of the world towards a vision of peace and love were that of mysticism that developed in the tenth century and, more recently, that of the feminist thought of the late twentieth Century.

Through the minor art produced by women in the convent and by the beguines in their collective residences, a new vision of a peaceful world was possible. Not the grandiose work of art celebrating wars for power or supremacy, but a simple representation of life in the convents, in the orchards and gardens representation of payer and images of illumination, respect for the other. The feminists put into discussion the patriarchal mythology and, working in the interstitial of the great myths, re-narrated mythology from another point of view, that of the feminine.

Learning objectives:

  1. Art, myths and archetypes explore the shadow and evil in the collective culture and the individual.
  2. Medusa, after being abused, petrifies all the men that approach her. The Beheading of Caravaggio, his way of drawing, will help to understand how to represent evil in all its brutality as a way to redeem the soul.

Reading List Abuse of the Feminine:

  1. Laughing with Medusa – classical Myth and Feminist Thought. Zajko W., Leonard M. Oxford Univeristy press 2006.
  2. Queens, Saints, Heretics, Prostitutes. Women in Italy. Caterina Vezzoli in Europe’s Many Souls. Exploring Cultural Complexes and Identities. Edited by Joerg Rasche and Thomas Singer. Spring-JournL, INC. 2016
  3. Caliban and the Witch. Women, the Body and Primitive Accumulation. Silvia Federici. Autonomedia. 2004
  4. Art in support of life: Caravaggio and the Plague. Caterina Vezzoli. JAP Vol 66, 3, p584-604
  5. The Newly Born Woman. Ciseaux H., Clement. https://www.docdroid.net/UcRqHry/newlybornw-pdf#page=18
  6. The Fear of the Feminine. Erich Neumann. Bollingen Series – Princeton University Press. 1994

Biography:

Caterina Vezzoli is an Italian Jungian analyst in private practice in Milan (Italy). She trained as a psychologist at the University of Padua and at the C.G. Jung Institute in Zurich and is a training analyst there and at the Centro Italiano di Psicologia Analitica (CIPA). She has served as Director of Studies, Honorary Secretary and Treasurer of CIPA’s Milan Institute, as well as its National Treasurer and Vice President. She taught for many years in the department of psychiatry at the University of Milan. She has done extensive research on children’s dreams, child analysis, the psychology and physiology of sleeping and dreaming, the associations experiment, and has written extensively on these topics. She has also been a member of the IAAP international committee for coordination and development of Jungian child analysis and is the IAAP liaison for the developing group in Malta. She is President & Director of Philemon Foundation.

 

Cristopher Carter & Tiffany Houck (USA) 18TH MAY


Evil as Systemic Racism

Course Overview

In Jungian Reflections on Systemic Racism: Reflections from Members of an American Psychoanalytic Learning Community (Routledge 2023), Carter and Houck, et. al employ major tenents of Jung’s theory of individuation (i.e., the complex, individuation, primitivity, dissociation, projection and recollection) in discussing the impact of unconscious racial bias in Jung’s writings, common interpretations/applications of his paradigm. Jung’s highly innovative method remains efficacious. Carter and Houck propose that the Jungian method is resourceful in grappling with personal and systemic impacts of racism.

In this course, Evil and Systemic Racism, Houck and Carter draw largely from their contributions to Jungian Reflections on Systemic Racism to examine pejorative othering through intrapsychic and inter-relational lenses, creating dialogue by first identifying under-addressed attitudes and behaviors such as analytic anonymity or analytic neutrality that may may promote barriers to inclusivity through unconscious enactments.

In exploring white-body supremacy trauma (Menakem 2017) and the attitude of white supremacy (Carter 2023) in analytic psychology, Houck and Carter utilize Jungian analytic theory to promote empathic discussions that exemplify a psychoanalytic method of deconstructing systematized and systemic racism within Jungian theory. In doing so, they employ the specificity and ingenuity of Jung’s analytic paradigm to offer insight into the work of anti-racism from a depth psychological perspective.

Attendees of Evil and Systemic Racism will explore how a community might work toward greater consciousness by using its own method to critique and advance its paradigm, promoting greater inclusivity within its training programs and clincial practices.

Evil and Systemic Racism is a course that is suitable for the public, mental health and medical professionals, sociologists, and all those interested in the wide impact of the unscientific construct, ‘race’. This course is open to anyone interested in the work of C. G. Jung (working with terror and trauma). Lay persons as well as professionals are welcome.

Learning objectives

  1. To explore a Jungian understanding of the relation of evil to ‘race;
  2. To understand the concepts of race and white supremacy from the perspective of archetypes and the collective unconscious;
  3. To ponder how clincial practices may inadvertently implicate the analyst in the present-day systematization of racializing.

Reccomended reading:

  • Carter, C. J. and Houck, Tiffany, eds. (2023). Jungian Reflections on Systemic Racism: Members of an American Psychoanalytic Community on Training, Practice and Inclusivity (Routledge 2023).
  • Videotaped podcast: ‘Tiffany and Christopher’ (12 Oct. 2023). Rendering Unconscious, Episode RU265. Dr. Vanessa Sinclair, host. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_p8vE3DeeJ4 [53:04 min.].
  • Brewster, F. (2019). The Racial Complex: A Jungian Perspective on Culture and Race. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Menakem, R. (2017). My Grandmother’s Hands: Racialized Trauma and the Pathway to mending Our Hearts and Bodies. Nevada: Central Recovery Press.
  • Morgan, H. (2021). The Work of Whiteness: A Psychoanalytic Perspective. New York: Routledge.
  • Singer, T. and Kimbles, S. L., eds. (2004). The Cultural Complex: Contemporary Jungian Perspectives on Psyche and Society. New York: Brunner-Routledge.
  • Kimbles, Samuel (2021). Intergenerational Complexes in Analytical Psychology: The Suffering of Ghosts. London and New York: Routledge.

Biographies

Christopher Jerome Carter, MDiv, ThM, PhD, LP, NCPsyA is a licensed psychoanalyst, certified in Jungian analysis, with a private practice in New York. Dr. Carter has over 30 years of leadership experience in designing and implementing housing and mental health services for the chronically homeless living with serious and persistent mental illnesses. He has ghostwritten several works in mental health and clinical psychology, including topics of clinical psychology and of spiritual reflection and individuation. His article, ‘Time for Space at the Table: an African-American/ Native-American analyst-in-training’s first-hand reflections. A call for the IAAP to publicly denounce (but not erase) the White supremacist writings of C.G. Jung’ (2021, Journal of Analytical Psychology, 66, I, 70-92), is a recipient of the 2021 Gradiva Award (NAAP). Dr. Carter is co-editor of Jungian Theory and Systematized Racism: Reflections from an American Psychoanalytic Learning Community (2023, Routledge).

Tiffany N. Houck, M.Div., Ph.D., L.P. is a licensed psychoanalyst, certified Jungian Analyst in private practice in New York City. Dr. Houck serves as the current Director of Training and is a faculty member of the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association in New York City. She is the author of History Through Trauma: History and Counter-History in the Hebrew Bible (2018, Wipf and Stock Publishers). She is a contributing author to Lockdown Therapy (2022, Routledge) and co-editor of Jungian Theory and Systematized Racism: Reflections from an American Psychoanalytic Learning Community (2023, Routledge) and has published numerous journal articles including ‘A Womb of One’s Own: Trauma, the Transcendent and the Transference in the Borderline Phenomenon’ (2021, Taylor & Frances Group), at the intersection of studies in gender and sexuality, psychoanalysis, religion, and trauma.

 

Lionel Corbett (US) 15TH JUNE


The Evil Shadow Of Religion

Course overview

This course will discuss six ways in which religions cause a great deal of evil. One is the result of religious narcissism, the notion that a particular tradition is superior to all the others, and only that tradition is a path to salvation. The second is the level of violence fostered by religious traditions, while the third is the remarkable level of misogyny found in the theistic traditions. The fourth is the way in which human psychological needs for power and domination are projected onto the theistic image of God. The fifth is the mythology of the End Times, which will lead to a violent confrontation of good and evil, while the sixth is the tendency towards masochism fostered by some traditions.

Religion can be used in the service of maintaining or enhancing the adherent’s self-esteem, or to feel superior and special. In part this occurs by insisting on the primacy of a particular sacred text, in part by insisting that its adherents have a special connection to God, using phrases such as “saved” or “chosen.” Many human narcissistic needs are projected onto the image of God in the Hebrew Bible, resulting in a God-image characteristic of borderline psychopathology. In Christianity, deviation from official doctrine led to murderous violence against nonbelievers. Religious violence is a sometimes a feature of religious doctrine, not a perversion of it, as if “God wills it.” Warfare has long been associated with religion, and violence can easily be spiritualized, sometimes motivated by apocalyptic fantasies about who will be the elect and who will be saved. Misogyny and the fear of women are disguised by religious teachings and sacred texts. This problem permeated the Bible and the Abrahamic traditions. Moral masochism is also disguised as necessary suffering in the service of a transcendent goal.

Learning Objectives: (Pending updates)

Biography

Dr. Lionel Corbett trained in medicine and psychiatry in England and as a Jungian Analyst at the C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago. He is a professor of depth psychology at Pacifica Graduate Institute, in Santa Barbara, California. He is the author of seven books: Psyche and the sacred: The religious function of the psyche; The sacred cauldron: Psychotherapy as a spiritual practice; The soul in anguish: Psychotherapeutic approaches to suffering; Understanding Evil: A guide for psychotherapists, and The God-image: From antiquity to Jung. His latest book is: Jung’s philosophy, controversies, quantum mechanics, and the Self. He is the co-editor of four volumes of collected papers: Psyche’s Stories; Depth psychology, meditations in the field; Psychology at the threshold; and Jung and aging. Contact email: corb@pacifica.edu

Recommended reading lists (Pending updates)

 

Alan Vaughn (US) 29TH JUNE


Evil as Authoritarianism/Colonialism

(Original Sin, Evil, and Confession: Truth and Reconciliation of the Colonial Enterprise)

Course Overview

From the archetypal perspective, this seminar addresses the subject of Evil as an Original Sin, expressed as shadow phenomena and negative aspects of the Trickster archetype in individual and group psyche, and collective group governance structures. Perspectivism is foundational to the analysis and discussion along with dialectical considerations of Good as the counterpoint to Evil, represented in the archetype of Justice. The archetypal perspective of Good is amplified in Kemetic – Egyptian mythology and cultural complexes. The presentation and discussion include: The archetypes of Culture, the Trickster, and Justice; Pan European and American cultural complexes in the protocols for the colonial enterprise; the example of the Berlin Conference (1884-1885), encoding colonization into the canons of European International law; the African Diaspora emerging from the Cultural Unconscious and the African Cultural Unconscious; reference to Pan African Liberation Movements for freedoms and against colonialism and domestic apartheid; the U.S. Civil Rights Movement against violence, terror, and murder particular to American apartheid; and the current Culture wars, as a retrenchment of racism, the pathogen infecting current U.S. Constitutional Jurisprudence, psyche, and systems in the U.S. Political Economy. We conclude with consideration of Jung’s recommended stages of treatment for psychopathology.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Knowledge of the Archetypal and dialectical perspectives expressed in concepts of Evil and Justice in theories of Analytical psychology and comparative mythology.
  2. Knowledge of Colonialism and Pan European Colonization protocols, specific to the Africa Region.
  3. Knowledge of Domestic apartheid and the psychopathology of racism.
  4. Knowledge of Movements for liberation and against the psychopathology of racism and colonialism.

Recommended reading:

  • Budge, E.W. (1969). The Gods of the Egyptians, studies in Egyptian mythology.
  • New York: Dover Publications, Inc.
  • Bynum, E.B. (1999). The African unconscious, roots of ancient mysticism and modern psychology.
  • New York and London: Teachers College Press.
  • Gomez, M. (2020). Reversing sail, a history of the African Diaspora, (2ed).
  • Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Henderson, J. (1903). Cultural attitudes in psychological perspective. Toronto, Canada: Inner City Books.
  • Hopcke, R. (1989). A guided tour of The Collected Works of C. G. Jung.
  • Boston: Shambhala.
  • Jung, C.G. (1973). Answer to Job, (From the Collected Works of C.G. Jung, Vol. 11, Psychology of Religion West, and East). Bollingen Series XX, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.
  • Stein M. (Ed), (1995): Encountering Jung on Evil. New Jersey: Princeton University Press.
  • Vaughan, A. (2021). Phenomenology of the Trickster archetype, U.S. electoral politics and the Black Lives Matter Movement. Journal of Analytical Psychology (JAP), Vol. 66, #3 June 2021
  • Vaughan, A (2020). Every voice and every vote counts. In Thomas Singer ( Ed), Cultural Complexes and the Soul of America, myth, psyche, and politics. London and New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.
  • Vaughan, A. (2020) Humanity and inhumanity: Relational themes in Humanistic – Existential psychology and multiculturalism in U.S. Constitutional Jurisprudence and the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In (Hoffman, Cleary- Hoffman, St. John, (Eds). Humanistic Approaches to Multiculturalism and Diversity. New York and London: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.

Legal Cases

  • Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission: 558 U.S. 310 (2010)
  • Shelby County v. Holder, 570 U.S. 529 (2013)
  • Students for Fair Admissions (SFFA) v. President and Fellow of Harvard 600 U.S.181 (2023)
  • Students for Fair Admissions (SFFA) v. University of North Carolina (2023)

Biography:

Alan G. Vaughan, Ph.D., JD, is an analyst member of the C.G Jung Institute of San Francisco, where he serves on the editorial board of the Jung Journal of Culture & Psyche, and the Committee on Diversity and Inclusion. He is in private practice as a Jungian analyst, and as a clinical & consulting psychologist. He holds a faculty position in the Saybrook University doctoral clinical psychology program. His scholarship interests are at the intersections of Analytical psychology, U.S. Constitutional Jurisprudence, and African Diaspora Studies. His recent publication “Every voice, every vote counts: challenges to Multicultural Democracy”. In Cultural Complexes and the Soul of America, Myths, Psyche and Politics (Routledge, 2020). His book, Jung in the African Diaspora will be published by Routledge, in Spring (2025)

 

Henry Abramovitch (Israel) 20TH JULY


Analysis in the Shadow of Terror: Clinical Aspects

Course Overview

This presentation focuses on the impact of terror on the analytical situation in Israel, especially holding the temenos, dreams, and the therapeutic relationship. The lecture draws on the pioneering work of Jung and Erich Neumann. Special attention is given to my work with Palestinian patients. It also gives case material of others directed effected by trauma. It begins with active imagination and goes on to discuss conscious and unconscious fantasies concerning safety, who is the enemy and the nature of evil, both personal and archetypal. Although clinical details come from Israel, I believe that many of the phenomena can be applied to terror situations elsewhere. Given the ubiquitous nature of terror and violence, it is vital to understand its dynamic and how it effects practice of analysis.

Learning objectives

  1. To understand the Jungian perspective on the nature of evil, trauma and terror
  2. To understand the impact of terror situation on analysis, dreamwork, therapeutic relationship and in cultural context in Israel.

Recommended reading

  • Murray Stein & Henry Abramovitch, The Analyst and Rabbi – A Play Asheville, North Carolina: Chiron Publications. 2019. The play is based on historic meeting between CG Jung and his old friend Rabbi Leo Baeck, who accuses him of antisemitism. The play itself can be seen via this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JsAMVbRYaGA
  • Murray Stein (Ed.). 2023. The Shadow and the Problem of Evil: Five Examinations. Chiron Publications. Especially Ch. 1,5.
  • John Beebe (2003). Terror, Violence and the Impulse to Destroy: Perspectives from Analytical Psychology. Daimon.
  • Henry Abramovitch (2016). ‘The Search for a New Ethic: Professional and Clinical Dilemmas’ in Turbulent Times, Creative Minds: Erich Neumann and C.G. Jung in Relationship (1933-1960). Edited by Erel Shalit & Murray Stein. Chiron Publications. pp.167-184.

Biography

Henry Abramovitch, Ph.D., is Founding President and senior training analyst at the Israel Institute of Jungian Psychology in Honor of Erich Neumann, Professor Emeritus at Tel Aviv University Medical School and Past President of Israel Anthropological Association. He is active in Israel Interfaith Encounter Association. He teaches and supervises Routers in the IAAP Developing Groups across Eastern Europe and Kazakhstan. He does international workshops on ethics, brothers and sisters, and with Jan Wiener on Beginnings and Endings of psychotherapy and analysis For many years, he was Director of the unique Intensive School in Analytical Psychology for Russian speakers in Israel with participants coming from Kazakhstan through to Latvia. His

anthropological speciality is death, mourning, funerals but is also teaches on issues in transcultural therapy and analysis. Recently, he is interested in the role of friends and friendship in life and in analysis. He is author of The First Father (2010); Brothers and Sisters: Myth and Reality (2014; 2nd expanded edition 2024); Why Odysseus Came Home as a Stranger and Other Puzzling Moments in the Life of…Great Individuals (2020), and with Murray Stein, the plays, The Analyst and the Rabbi (2019), My Lunch with Thomas (2023), Speaking of Friends (2023) and Eranos (2023), available on Youtube. His first novel, Panic Attacks in Pistachio: A Psychological Detective Story as published by Chiron Publication this year. Since the beginning of the war, he has led a Reflection Group for Ukrainian Analysts on Zoom. He lives and practices in the Holy City of Jerusalem. Email: henry.abramovitch@gmail.com

 

Renos Papadopoulos (UK) 27TH JULY


Evil as Destructiveness, Atrocities and Healing: Epistemological and Clinical Reflections

Course Overview:

Manifestations of destructiveness and of wider phenomena, of what I term Severe Forms of Collective Adversity, are so pervasive and have such multidimensional impact on our lives that it is difficult to create a vantage point from where to appropriately examine them. Moreover, due to their very nature (which combines highly emotional states with the raw concreteness of their destructive effects, along with the urgent need to address their harmful consequences), such phenomena tend to overwhelm us. In turn, when we are overwhelmed, our capacity for processing not only our perceptions of events and circumstances around us but also our own very experiences becomes impaired. Then, with diminished capacity to process, we tend to lose clarity, weakening our ability to discern complexity. Ultimately, without the facility to grasp complexity, we are prone to oversimplified and polarised perceptions of such highly complex phenomena.

In my presentation, creatively using extensions of Jungian insights, I will present and discuss a framework that can be used to identify complexities such as, in addition to their negative effects, catastrophic events also provide opportunities for certain forms of transformative individuation. This innovative framework, which has a proven applicability, emphasises the pivotal relevance of epistemological processes that take place during such attempts at comprehending these multifaceted phenomena. Specific attention is going to be given to the meaning of archetypal epistemology. I will argue that the main (and neglected) Jungian contribution to our understanding of destructiveness is in terms of discerning the relevance of archetypal epistemology, i.e. the impact that archetypal influences have on the way we form our very presuppositions in encountering such phenomena of Severe Forms of Collective Adversity.

Learning objectives:

  1. To become aware of the complexity and multifaceted nature of destructiveness without reducing it to simplistic theorisation.
  2. To become aware of typical epistemological errors and traps whenever we encounter phenomena of Severe Forms of Collective Adversity
  3. To appreciate the importance of epistemological rigour and epistemological flexibility in approaching phenomena of destructiveness, and, more specifically, of the usefulness of employing archetypal epistemology in such endeavours.

Recommended reading:

  • Jung, C. G. (1928). The Swiss line in the European spectrum. CW 10.
  • Jung, C.G. (1943). Psychotherapy and a philosophy of life. CW 16.
  • Papadopoulos, R.K. (1997). Individual identity and collective narratives of conflict. Harvest: Journal for Jungian Studies, 43, 2, 7–26.
  • Papadopoulos, R.K. (1998) Destructiveness, atrocities and healing: Epistemological and clinical reflections. Journal of Analytical Psychology, 43, 455–477.
  • Papadopoulos, R. (1999). Working with Bosnian medical evacuees and their families: Therapeutic dilemmas. Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 4(1), 107–120.
  • Papadopoulos, R.K. (2000). Factionalism and interethnic conflict: narratives in myth and politics. In Singer, T. (Ed.) The Vision Thing. Myth, Politics and Psyche in the World. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Papadopoulos, R.K. (2002). Refugees, home and trauma. In Papadopoulos , R.K. (Ed.) Therapeutic Care for Refugees. No Place Like Home. London: Karnac. Tavistock Clinic Series.
  • Papadopoulos, R. K. (2005). Political violence, trauma and mental health interventions. In Kalmanowitz, D. & Lloyd, B. (Eds.) Art Therapy and Political Violence. With Art, Without Illusion. London: Brunner-Routledge.
  • Papadopoulos, R. K. (2006). Terrorism and panic. Psychotherapy and Politics International, Vol. 4 Number 2, 90-100.
  • Papadopoulos, R.K. (2007). Refugees, Trauma and Adversity-Activated Development. European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling, 9 (3), 301-312.
  • Papadopoulos, R. K. (2010). Extending Jungian Psychology. Working with survivors of political upheavals. In Heuer, G. (Ed.) Sacral Revolutions: Cutting Edges in Psychoanalysis and Jungian Analysis. London: Routledge.
  • Papadopoulos, R.K. (2018). Trauma and Umwelt. An Archetypal Framework for Humanitarian Interventions. In Maercker, A., Heim, E. & Kirmayer, L.J. (Eds.) Cultural Clinical Psychology and PTSD. Göttingen: Hogrefe.
  • Papadopoulos, R.K. (Ed.) (2020). Moral Injury and Beyond. Understanding Human Anguish and Healing Traumatic Wounds. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Papadopoulos R.K. (2021a). Involuntary Dislocation: Home, Trauma, Resilience and Adversity-Activated Development. London & New York: Routledge.
  • Papadopoulos R.K. (2021b). The approach of Synergic Therapeutic Complexity with Involuntarily Dislocated people. Systemic Thinking & Psychotherapy. Issue 18; April.
  • Papadopoulos R.K. (2021c). Families migrating together. In Bhugra, D. (Ed.) The Oxford Textbook of Migrant Psychiatry. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Papadopoulos R.K. (2022) Therapeutic Complexity. In Maloney, C., Nelki, J. and Summers, A. (Eds.) Seeking Asylum and Mental Health. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Papadopoulos, R.K. (in press). Destructiveness, complexity and archetypal epistemology: Critical reflections. In Carpani, S. (Ed.) War as Reset. London and New Year: Routledge.
  • Papadopoulos, R. K. & Gionakis, N. (2018). The neglected complexities of refugee fathers. Psychotherapy and Politics International, 16(1).
  • Papadopoulos, R. K. & Hildebrand, J. (1997). Is home where the heart is? Narratives of oppositional discourses in refugee families. In Papadopoulos, R.K. & Byng-Hall, J. (Eds.) Multiple Voices; Narrative in Systemic Family Psychotherapy. London: Duckworth.

Biography:

Renos K Papadopoulos, PhD., FBPsS., is Professor of Analytical Psychology and Director of the Centre for Trauma, Asylum and Refugees and of the MA /PhD Programmes in Refugee Care at the University of Essex, as well as Honorary Clinical Psychologist and Systemic Family Psychotherapist at the Tavistock Clinic. He is a training and supervising Jungian psychoanalyst and systemic family psycho-therapist in private practice. As consultant to the United Nations and many other organisations, he has been working with refugees, tortured persons, trafficked people and other survivors of political violence and disasters in many countries. His writings have appeared in 18 languages. He was a member of the Executive Committee of the IAAP for several years, setting up, inter alia, the Developing Groups within IAAP, the Academic Subcommittee and the Publications Subcommittee; he was the editor of The IAAP Newsletter for 8 years, of Harvest: International

Journal for Jungian Studies for 14 years, founder editor of the International Journal of Jungian Studies, and co-founder of the ‘International Association for Jungian Studies’ (IAJS). Last year, IAJS gave him the ‘C.G. Jung 2022 Award’ for ‘Lifetime Achievement and significant contributions in scholarship, leadership, service, mentorship, clinical praxis, and innovation in Analytical Psychology and post-Jungian studies.’

 

Marianne Meister (CH) 19th OCTOBER


Evil and Painting/Drawing

Course Overview

Evil is obviously part of mankind, otherwise it could not spread in the world in so many different ways:

“One must be positively blind not to see the colossal role that evil plays in the world. Indeed, it took the intervention of God himself to deliver humanity from the curse of evil, for without his intervention man would have been lost.”

C.G. Jung, CW 9 II, § 114

We are currently experiencing its violent grimace on a collective level in the most diverse hotspots of war, of which I would only like to mention Russia’s “special operation” in Ukraine and the war between Israel and the Palestinians.

The responsible warmongers are obviously under the dominance of the negative masculine, which wants to exercise power and achieve problematic victories at the cost of the lives of many of its fighting young men and women. There is also little regard for the suffering of the civilian population. The effects of such an irresponsible and destructive policy can be devastating on a psychological level, even for people who are not directly exposed to war, especially if a negative, dominant father complex and a weak mother complex are present.

I would like to illustrate this with the example of two female analysands, women in their best years, who grew up in very different civilizations, but who both initially reacted to the hotspots of war with a state of shock.

We will delve into at least two of the paintings of my two analysands. They reflect the feeling of complete powerlessness and numbness as well as the struggle for inner stability and the constellation of self-healing powers and hope.

Learning objectives:

  1. The relieving, transforming and ultimately healing effect of painting will be illustrated in this lecture.
  2. It will also become clear: where words are lacking, feelings can be expressed with colors.

Reading suggestion:

  • Christie, Agatha: Evil Under the Sun
  • Jung, Carl Gustav: Aion. Researches into the Phenomenology of the Self. Collected works 9 II, §§ 19, 114, 170.
  • Jung, Carl Gustav: Psychological Types Collected works 6, §§ 314, 315, 318, 319, 389
  • Lorenz, Konrad: The So-Called Evil.

Biography:

Marianne Meister-Notter, Dr. Phil. is a Swiss psychotherapist working with adults, children and adolescents in her own private practice in Zürich (CH). She is a former Vice President of the Curatorium, as well as the Head of the “Further Training & Vocational Policy” committee, and is a lecturer, training analyst and supervisor at the C.G. Jung Institute Zürich, in Küsnacht, Switzerland. She is the president of the Ethics Commission of the Association of Swiss Psychotherapists (ASP). Her most recent publication is titled The Key to Self: Recognition of Self Through Depth-Psychology-Oriented Astrology (Patmos, 2015 and Chiron 2022).

 

Eva Pattis (Italy) 21st SEPTEMBER


Evil and Sandplay: Expressive Sandwork in contexts of war and disruption

Course Overview

In this course, we will delve into the psyche’s inherent ability and resolve to self-regulate through the creation of images and narratives, especially when offered a “free and protected space” – a concept pioneered by Dora Kalff, the founder of Sandplay Therapy. I will showcase a diverse array of examples from sandwork projects conducted in Ukraine and Colombia, demonstrating how a sandbox and a curated collection of miniatures can serve as valuable tools in trauma treatment. Emphasizing a non-directive and resource-oriented approach, these examples will illuminate the efficacy of this therapeutic method.

Throughout the course, we will closely examine sandwork processes employed with children facing extreme situations, where themes of evil, adversity, and abuse loom large. By analyzing these instances, we aim to gain a deeper understanding of the profound impact that sandplay therapy can have in fostering healing and resilience in challenging circumstances.

Learning objectives:

  1. Improving the capacity to observe unconscious expressions and especially understand symbolic play of children.
  2. Recognizing self-regulatory tendencies of the psyche in sandplay processes.
  3. Recognizing contra-transference reactions, while assisting the child’s play.

Recommended reading:

  • Eva Pattis Zoja: Sandplay Therapy in Vulnerable Communities, Routledge 2001.
  • Eva Pattis Zoja: Where Soul meets Matter (II.. Part), Chiron 2018
  • Renos Papadopoulos, Involuntary Dislocation, Home, Trauma, Resilience and Adversity Activated Development, Routledge 2021.
  • Ursula Wirtz: Trauma and Beyond, the Mystery of Transformation, Spring 2014

Biography:

Eva Pattis (1952 in Bolzano) is a clinical psychologist and Jungian psychoanalyst for adults and children. Teaching activities at the C. G. Jung Institute, Zürich, the C.G. Jung Foundation in New York, ÖGAP in Vienna, DGAP in Berlin and Stuttgart, CIPA Milan, SAAJA in Cape Town, From 2002 – 2010 teaching and training for IAAP Developing Groups in Hong Kong and Buenos Aires. Private analytical practice in Milan (1985 -2000 and from 2002 to current date) and in New York from 2000 -2002. Founder of IAES (International Association of Expressive Sandwork), a non profit organization which creates projects of Expressive Sandwork in areas where psychotherapy is not available. (www.sandwork.org). Books: Sandplay Therapy: The Treatment of Psychopathologies (ed.) DaimonVerlag, 2002. Einsiedeln; Sandplay Therapy in Vulnerable Communities, Routledge 2011, London & New York; Abortion, Loss and Reneval, a Search for Identity, Routledge 2001, London & New York; Where Soul Meets matter” , clinical and social applications of Jungian Sandplay Therapy, Chiron 2018.

 

Renate Daniels (Germany) 5th OCTOBER


Evil and Fairytales

Course Overview:

Fairy tales describe archetypal patterns and thus collective unconscious processes that operate behind zeitgeist phenomena. They deepen our understanding of contemporary social phenomena.

Due to the increasing worldwide tensions and polarizations, including military conflicts, we want to start this seminar by addressing the collective shadow that we usually refer to as the devil. Fairy tales can show us what kind of attitude and behavior is needed in order not to be destroyed by this dark power. To understand war and destructiveness, it is also worth looking at fairy tales without happy endings. They can teach us which archetypal patterns pave the way of destructive developments.

Learning objectives:

  1. To gain a better understanding of the psychodynamic background of brutality, destruction and sadism.
  2. To recognize where and which helpful potentials and resources are to be found in the confrontation with the evil.

Recommended reading:

  • Franz, M.-L.v. (1974). Shadow and Evil in Fairy Tales. Zürich: Spring.
  • Jacoby, M. ,Kast, V., Riedel, I. (1992) Witches, Ogres and the Devil’s daughter. Shambala.
  • Birkhäuser-Oeri, S. (1988). The Mother: Archetypal Image in Fairy Tales. Toronto: Inner City.
  • Dieckmann, H. (1986). Twice-Told Tales: The Psychological Use of Fairy Tales. Wilmette: Chiron.
  • Franz, M.L. v. (1996), The Interpretation of Fairy Tales. (Revised ed.) Boston and London: Shambhala
  • Franz, M.-L.v. (1972). Problems of the Feminine in Fairy Tales. New York: Spring.
  • Franz, M.-L.v. (1997) Archetypal Patterns in Fairy tales,
  • Kast, V. (1995): Folktales as Therapy. Fromm, New York.

Biography:

Renate Daniel, MD, studied medicine at the University of Heidelberg and specialized in the fields of psychiatry and psychotherapy. She is a Jungian analyst, training analyst/supervisor and member of the Curatorium at the C.G. Jung Institute in Zurich. She also works as a specialist at the C.G. Jung Outpatient’s Clinic in Zurich and is a member of the Scientific Management Board of the International Society of Depth Psychology (IGT), furthermore a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Lindau Psychotherapy Weeks (LPTW), held in Germany.

 

Maria Giovanna Bianchi (IT) 26th OCTOBER


Evil and Innocents: Working with Human Rights Violations in Clinical and Community Settings

Course Overview

Learning objectives:

1) how analytical psychology helps in understanding the profoundly human, social and political issues that contribute to human rights violations; and 2) how analytical psychology is an effective therapeutic tool for the healing of both individual victims of human rights violations and societies in the aftermath of collective violence.

The psychoanalytic approach, among the several existing branch of psychotherapy, may not be the first tool that comes to mind to contrast the devastating impact that human rights violations have on individual victims and societies in the aftermath of collective violence. However, a growing number of individual psychoanalysts is taking position on issues surrounding human rights, social justice or even justice, tout court. Analytical societies as well show a progressively growing sensitivity to such themes, mainly because of the ever-growing corpus of theories, literature and appreciation of the impact of trauma on mental functioning and of its transmission across generations. Among the different psychoanalytic approaches, analytical psychology, with its emphasis on and exploration of the collective shadow and the collective unconscious, is particularly relevant: Jung himself commented on how the intertwining between collective shadow and unconscious material altered mass consciousness in a mutually reinforcing spiral with disastrous consequences for individuals and humanity.

To assist victims of human rights violations a trans-disciplinary approach is necessary. It presupposes that the knowledge and experience derived from different fields such as psychoanalysis, human rights law, forensic sciences, sociology and politics, be organized around the understanding of complex themes and the construction of meaning:

Learning objectives

  1. The purpose of the course is broaden our understanding of the impact of human rights violations on individuals and society and of our capacity to sustain and facilitate their healing through the tools that Jungian psychoanalyst have at their disposal.
  2. In detail, we will try to answer the following questions: how are certain horrors possible? Is it possible to contribute to their understanding? What happens to an individual during and after being victim of a human rights violations? How societies react in ignoring, being complicit or, on the contrary, attempting to redress such crimes? How can a Jungian psychoanalyst support individual victims, and through them, society to survive, elaborate, integrate and give a personal meaning to the horror?

Recommended reading

  • ARENDT, H. (1963). Eichmann in Jerusalem – A Report on the Banality of Evil. New York: Viking Press.
  • BIANCHI, M.G. (2020). Il potere curativo della giustizia: un’esplorazione dei rapporti tra psicologia analitica e diritti umani. Polis e psiche: politica e prospettive analitiche nella contemporaneità. Studi Junghiani, 26(2), 38–52.
  • BIANCHI, M.G. (2023). Victims of Enforced Disappearances: Absent Bodies, Inner Presences. Journal of Analytical Psychology, Apr, 68(2), pp. 327-336. https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-5922.12901
  • BIANCHI, M.G. (2024). “Memories of enforced disappearance: Psychological need and political aim” in BIANCHI, M.G., & LUCI, M. (eds.) (2024) Psychoanalytic, Psychosocial, and Human Rights Perspectives on Enforced Disappearance. London: Routledge.
  • BIANCHI, M.G., & LUCI, M. (eds.) (2024) Psychoanalytic, Psychosocial, and Human Rights Perspectives on Enforced Disappearance. London: Routledge.
  • CITRONI G., SCOVAZZI T., (2007), The Struggle against Enforced Disappearance and the 2007 United Nations Convention, Leiden, Boston: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers.
  • DAUD A., SKOGLUND E., RYDELIUS P., (2005), “Children in families of torture victims: transgenerational transmission of parents’ traumatic experiences to their children”, International Journal of Social Welfare, 14, 23-32.
  • KALSHED D. (1996), The Inner World of Trauma: Archetypal Defences of the Personal Spirit, London and New York: Routledge.
  • KALSHED D. (2013), Trauma and the Soul: A psycho-spiritual approach to human development and its interruption, London and New York: Routledge.

Biography

Maria Giovanna Bianchi, PhD, is a Jungian psychoanalyst (CGJIZ-IAAP and ASP) in private practice in Geneva, Switzerland. She obtained a Masters degree in Political Science from the University of Bologna, a PhD in International Relations from the University of Padova, and a Diploma in Jungian Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapist specialized in adults, adolescents, and children from the C.G. Jung Institute in Zürich. She worked as human rights officer at the United Nations for almost three decades. Since 2019, she is a member of the Board of Directors of the C.G. Jung Foundation, Zürich. She is Training Analyst and Supervisor in training at the C.G. Jung Institute in Zürich and Supervisor for analyst trainees pursuing the Router Training of the International Association for Analytical Psychology. She authors articles, speaks at international conferences, and lectures in academic and professional contexts on the trans-disciplinarity and complementarity between human rights and analytical psychology. She recently co-edited Psychoanalytic, Psychosocial and Human Rights Perspectives on Enforced Disappearance (Routledge, 2024).

 

Loralee M. Scott (USA) 2nd NOVEMBER


Evil and Dance/Archetypal Narrative Movement

Course Description:

Archetypal evil exists as a psychoid complex that can neither be eliminated from nor integrated within the individual psyche. Its obvious presence throughout history reveals not only its persistence as a collective complex, but the unconscious nature of its origins that reveal themselves only in the wake of its destructive path; leaving individuals and entire civilizations to grapple with the trauma and moral injury of horrors that defy words.

Archetypal evil drags us to the depths where words are neither possible nor decipherable. When this type of pain enters the room, it silences everything else. In order to work through its aftermath, we must first work with what has the capacity to go more deeply than words. Having personally wrestled with the horrors of WWII, Erich Neumann recognized this when he wrote: “The individual history of every creative man is always close to the abyss of sickness;…His wounds remain open, but his suffering from them is situated in depths from which another curative power arises, and this curative power is the creative process.”

While dance is often thought of simply as an art form, as the movement of the dancer’s body, it is movement at a much deeper level. Dance is the transference of psychic energy. It has the capacity to move us on the deepest levels of being, to shift the tectonic plates of the unconscious of both the artist and the audience. To dance is to give expression to that which is not able to be spoken and so must be danced. It exists in the space between symbol and language, in the margins where meaning is more felt than understood, where reality is more experienced than explained. The dancer becomes the vessel for that which transcends speech, transcends conscious thought and like the wind, is visible only as evidenced by what it moves. Dance enables engagement with archetypal energies flowing beneath the level of consciousness. It has the capacity to unlock those frozen with the unspeakable terror of trauma by connecting us with the resilient potency of the creative unconscious.

This course will work with a real world case study that looks at dance theater through the lens of depth psychology in order to discover its capacity to effect transformation in both the performer as well as the audience through the transference of psychic energy at an unconscious level.

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to explain dance as a vehicle for accessing and working with both the unconscious dynamics of trauma and the resilient force of the creative unconscious
  2. Participants will be able to identify four key principles in working with the psychoid and unconscious nature of archetypal evil through the art form of dance.

Recommended Reading List:

  • Neumann, E. (1959). Art and the Creative Unconscious: Four Essays. New York: Pantheon.
  • Jung, C.G. (1949). Psychology of the Unconscious. Mineola, NY: Dover Publications.
  • Jung, C.G. (1966). The Spirit in Man, Art and Literature. Bollingen: Princeton University Press.
  • Herman, J.L. (1992) Trauma and Recovery. New York: Basic Books
  • Van den Berk, Tjeu. (2012) Jung on Art: The Autonomy of the Creative Drive. New York: Routledge.
  • Graham, Martha. (1991) Blood Memory. New York: DoubleDay.
  • Thompson, Barbara E. and Neimeyer, Robert A. (2014) Grief and the Expressive Arts. New York: Routledge.

Biography:

Loralee M. Scott is Senior Director of Pacifica Extension and International Studies at Pacifica Graduate Institute. In addition to an MFA in inter-disciplinary studies, she brings over two decades of successful organizational leadership and a proven track record of post-graduate, Jungian informed curriculum design, development and delivery. A thought-leader, entrepreneur and sought-after speaker, she has lectured internationally in several countries. Her work as an award-winning choreographer was responsible for the passage of anti-trafficking legislation in Troy, NY and is featured in the book: Grief and the Expressive Arts published by Routledge.

 

Joel Kroeker (Canada) 16th NOVEMBER


Music and Evil: A Sonic Exploration Beyond The Safety of Words

Course Description:

In this course, we peer through the lens of Archetypal Music Psychotherapy (AMP), which focuses on acoustic symbols and their psychic impacts within our world. We begin with the notion that perception is a creative act, thus implicating us even in our most difficult confrontations. Through this experiential musical exploration, we will encounter a strange place beyond place called the musical interactive field. Similar to the landscape of a dream, fairy tale or myth, the musical field offers multiple levels of relevance where unbearable dissonance and opposition can co-exist without cancelling each other out. Perhaps this sonic imaginal and literal field is like Rumi’s meeting place “out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing” where we can truly dare to encounter the perilous Other.

Jung suggests (in Aion) that the nature of good and evil change over time such that our current epoch is a transition point where the Christ and Anti-Christ is in serious conflict. Jung’s Mysterium Coniunctionis suggests that “low grade untransformed desirousness” can be seen as the vicious and persecutory “evil” that results from the lower coniunctio which fails to reach full transformation. We will explore how a musically-oriented analysis tracks this same trajectory (intrapsychically, interpersonally and collectively) through various musical processes within the psychoanalytic consulting room.

In our current time, we find ourselves in a seemingly impossible bind where we cannot fully escape the reality of evil out there nor escape its reality within. To simply deny that which is real is to become identical with it, leading to a potentially more dangerous situation through the unconscious projection of archaic defenses and endless compulsive enactments. The musical interactive field offers a resilient transformative vessel and a potential way through this impossible conflict and the tensions that it inevitably brings.

If these images spark some life or interest in you, please contribute to this ongoing experiential exploration by joining us as a participant.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will increase their knowledge about Jung’s conception of Evil and how it’s inevitable conflicts (intrapsychically, interpersonally and collectively) can be approached through musical processes within and outside of analytical psychology.

Recommended Reading List:

  • Kroeker, Joel. (2019). Jungian music psychotherapy: When Psyche sings. Routledge.
  • Stein, Murray. (1996). “Jung on evil.” Encountering Jung.
  • Von Franz, M. L. (2017). Shadow and evil in fairy tales: Revised edition. Shambhala Publications.
  • Zweig, C., & Abrams, J. (1991). Meeting the shadow: The hidden power of the dark side of human nature. Penguin.

Biography:

Joel Kroeker, RCC-ACS, MMT, is a Jungian psychoanalyst, clinical supervisor and author with a private practice based in Victoria, BC. Drawing on over 25 years of diverse experience as a musician, educator and psychotherapist, Joel devotes part of his practice to training and supervising international practitioners in his original modality of Archetypal Music Psychotherapy across North and South America, China and parts of Europe. He currently serves as a journal reviews editor for the Journal of Analytical Psychology and divides his time outside of clinical hours between parenting, musicking, teaching and writing. His recent book, “Jungian Music Psychotherapy: When Psyche Sings” is a finalist for the IAJS (International Association for Jungian Studies) book award and has recently been released in Portuguese. His website is www.joelkroeker.com

 

Stefano Carpani (Italy) 30TH NOVEMBER


Evil as Reset: From the Suspension to the End of Certainties

Course Overview

The lecture delves into a multifaceted exploration of evil through the lens of historical, psychological, and cultural perspectives, anchored by references to Homer, Rosenthal, James Hillman, Simone Weil, and various historical figures and events. The central theme revolves around evil as a divine decree, predetermined and inescapable, possessing an intoxicating allure, and serving as an arena for the carving of legacies. The narrative then transitions to the 20th century, portraying evil as hell and prompting questions about the nature of evil, its prevention, and its enduring presence throughout human history. The lecture delves into the disillusionment and fragility of modern civilizations during WWI, drawing parallels with contemporary challenges and transformations. It explores the loss of dignity and integrity as a pivotal moment marking the end of the “World of Yesterday.” The analysis incorporates perspectives from Paul Valéry, Yeats, Joseph Roth, and the concept of “homo optionis” by sociologist Beck.

The discussion expands to the psychological dimensions of evil, emphasizing the intertwining of spirituality, decay, and chaos. The lecture suggests that war may result from the absence of gods or spiritual moorings. The perspectives of Jung, Zweig, and Roth are juxtaposed, questioning the role of God in a post-WWII world. The concept of evil as a psychosocial stance is introduced, with a focus on Jung’s pre-WWI perspective, the inevitability of decay, and the emergence of chaos. The paper then transitions to contemporary contexts, examining the societal shift from modernity to the “age of shocks” and the role of technology as a new deity. The discussion culminates in an exploration of evil as a remedy for unhappiness and a potential reset mechanism.

In summary, the lecture weaves together diverse perspectives to construct a comprehensive exploration of evil, encompassing historical, psychological, cultural, and contemporary dimensions. It prompts critical reflections on the enduring nature of conflict, societal transformations, and the intricate interplay of spirituality, decay, and the human psyche.

Learning objectives

  1. The lecture weaves together diverse perspectives to construct a comprehensive exploration of evil, encompassing historical, psychological, cultural, and contemporary dimensions.
  2. The Lecture prompts critical reflections on the enduring nature of evil, conflict, societal transformations, and the intricate interplay of spirituality, decay, and the human psyche.

Recommended reading

  • Bauman, Z. (2000). Liquid Modernity. Cambridge: Polity.
  • Beck, U., and Beck-Gernsheim, E. (2002). Individualization: Institutionalized Individualism and its Social and Political Consequences. London: Sage.
  • Beebe, J. and Carpani, S., (2023). “An Epistolary Conversation”, in the Journal of Analytical Psychology, 2023, 68, 4, 638–664. Co-Editors-in-Chief: Carolyn Bates and Arthur Niesser. Oxford: Wiley Publishing
  • Carpani, S., (2024). Absolute Freedom London: Routledge
  • Roth, J., (2013). The Radetzky March. Granta Books
  • Schnitzler, A. (2011). Traumnovelle. Kindle
  • Zweig, S., (2013). The World of Yesterday. University of Nebraska Press.

Biography

Stefano Carpani, Ph.D., is an Italian psychoanalyst and sociologist (member and lecturer of the C.G. Jung Institute Zürich, and University of Cambridge, respectively) working in private practice in Berlin (DE) and online. He initiated the YouTube series Breakfast at Küsnacht, Lockdown Therapy and War as Reset, and co-created Psychosocial Wednesdays (currently serving as its chairperson). He initiated and curates Jungianeum: Initiatives for Contemporary Analytical Psychology and neo-Jungian Studies, the book series titled Re-covered Classics in Analytical psychology and JUNGIANEUM/Yearbook. For the Italian magazine “Doppiozero,” he hosts a column titled “Cultivating the Soul in the SuperSociety.” He serves as scientific consultant to Pacifica Graduate Institute (USA). Among his edited books: Breakfast at Küsnacht (Chiron, 2020 – IAJS Best Edited Book nominee); Anthology of Contemporary Classics in Analytical psychology: The New Ancestors (Routledge, 2022 – GRADIVA Best Edited Book nominee). His forthcoming book is titled Absolute Freedom (Routledge, 2024)

Program Details

Dates

April 20th – November 30th, 2024

All Live Sessions will run on Saturdays from 8:00 – 9:30 AM PST
Or 4:00 – 5:30 PM GMT.

Registration Fees

  • $695.00 – Pacifica Student Rate
  • $895.00 – Pacifica Alumni, Full Time Students, & Senior Rate
  • $1095.00 – General Rate
  • $30 – Continuing Education Credits (14 CECHours)

Participants requesting Continuing Education Credits (CECs) for Online programs must attend all live sessions (offered via Zoom) in order to receive CECs. Please make sure that your Zoom account name matches the name of the attendee requesting CECs.

All of the live Zoom sessions will be recorded and made available to everyone registered for the program. If you watch the recordings and keep up with the online discussion forum you will qualify for the certificate of completion. Live attendance to the Zoom sessions is not necessary unless you are looking to obtain Continuing Education Credits.

About the Teachers

George Hogenson, Ph.D. is a senior training analyst at the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago.  He holds a Ph.D. in philosophy from Yale University and an M.A. in clinical social work from the University of Chicago.  He is the past Vice President of the International Association for Analytical Psychology and a member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Analytical Psychology.  He is the author of Jung’s Struggle with Freud and, with Thomas Kirsch, editor of The Red Book: Reflections on C.G. Jung’s Liber Novus.  His numerous papers on archetypal theory, the nature of symbolism, and synchronicity have contributed to reshaping thinking on these subjects within analytical psychology.  He lives in Oak Park, Illinois, and maintains a private practice in Chicago.

 

Alan G. Vaughan, Ph.D., JD, is an analyst member of the C.G Jung Institute of San Francisco, where he serves on the editorial board of the Jung Journal: Culture & Psyche, and the Committee on Diversity and Inclusion. He is in private practice as a psychoanalyst and as a clinical & consulting psychologist. He is a core faculty member in the Saybrook University doctoral clinical psychology program and directs the Jungian Studies specialization. His scholarship interests are at the intersections of: Analytical psychology, U.S. Constitutional Jurisprudence and African Diaspora Studies. His recent publications, “Every voice, every vote counts: challenges to Multicultural Democracy”, In Cultural Complexes and the Soul of America, Myths, Psyche and Politics (Routledge, 2020); Alan G. Vaughan (2022), On Jung, Archetypes, Aesthetics, and Culture in the Art from the African Diaspora, Jung Journal, 16:3, 38-70, DOI: 10.1080/19342039.2022.2088992; link https://doi.org/10.1080/19342039.2022.2088992. Forthcoming book, C.G. Jung and the African Diaspora, is to be published by Routledge.

 

Murray Stein, Ph.D. is a Training and Supervising Analyst at the International School of Analytical Psychology Zurich (ISAP-ZURICH). He has been president of the International Association for Analytical Psychology (IAAP) and President of ISAP-ZURICH and lectures internationally. He is the author of Jung’s Map of the Soul, Outside Inside and All Around, The Mystery of Transformation and many other books and articles. Six volumes of his Collected Writings have been published to date. He lives in Switzerland and has a private practice in Zurich and from his home in Goldiwil.

 

Prof. Dr. phil. Verena Kast, psychologist and psychotherapist, was professor of anthropological psychology at the University of Zurich. She is a teaching analyst and supervisor at the C.G. Jung-Institut Zurich and was President of the Curatorium of the Institute. She was co-director of the Lindauer Psychotherapiewochen, the largest German-speaking continuing education event in psychotherapy. Numerous publications in the field of fairy tales, symbolism in general, relationship, mourning processes, emotions also in connection with complex theory and imagination.

 

John Beebe, a former president of the C. G. Jung Institute of San Francisco, is a psychiatrist who specializes in psychotherapy. He is author of Energies and Patterns in Psychological Type: The Reservoir of Consciousness and co-editor of The Question of Psychological Types: The Correspondence of C. G. Jung and Hans Schmid-Guisan. John has received the President’s Award for Exceptional Service from the Association for Psychological Type International. In 2021, he edited a special issue of The Journal of Analytical Psychology in honor of the 100th anniversary of the publication of Jung’s Psychological Types. Beebe has spearheaded a Jungian typological approach to the analysis of film. His eight-function, eight-archetype model of type is widely studied and applied.

 

Renate Daniel, MD, studied medicine at the University of Heidelberg and specialized in the fields of psychiatry and psychotherapy. She is a Jungian analyst, training analyst/supervisor and Director of Programs at the C.G. Jung Institute in Zurich. She also works as a specialist at the C.G. Jung Outpatient’s Clinic in Zurich, and is a member of the Scientific Management Board of the International Society of Depth Psychology (IGT) and a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Lindau Psychotherapy Weeks (LPTW), held in Germany.

 

Polly Young-Eisendrath, Ph.D., is a psychologist, writer, speaker and Jungian analyst who has published 18 books (translated into 20 languages) including Love Between Equals: Relationship as a Spiritual Path, The Self-Esteem Trap: Raising Confident and Compassionate Kids in an Age of Self-Importance, The Cambridge Companion to Jung and The Present Heart: A Memoir of Love, Loss and Discovery. She maintains a clinical practice in Central Vermont and hosts the podcast Enemies: From War to Wisdom that provides a fresh look at human hostilities and what to do about them. She is a lifelong Buddhist practi­tioner and a mindfulness teacher.

 

Joseph Cambray, Ph.D. is the Past-President/CEO and Provost for Pacifica Graduate Institute; Past-President of the International Association for Analytical Psychology; served as the U.S. Editor for The Journal of Analytical Psychology and is on various editorial boards He was a faculty member at Harvard Medical School in the Department of Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies. Dr. Cambray is a Jungian analyst now living in the Santa Barbara area of California. His numerous publications include the book based on his Fay Lectures: Synchronicity: Nature and Psyche in an Interconnected Universe and several edited volumes: one with Leslie Sawin Research in Analytical Psychology – Volume 1: Applications from Scientific, Historical, and (Cross)-Cultural Research, and an earlier one with Linda Carter, Analytical Psychology: Contemporary Perspectives in Jungian Psychology. He has published numerous papers in a range of international journals.

 

Ursula Brasch MA, is a German Psychoanalyst in private Practice in Schopfheim (Germany). She is a Training Analyst and Supervisor at C.G. Jung Institutes Zürich and Stuttgart, Member of the Board of the C.G. Jung Institute Zürich. She studied Sinology, History, and Politics in Freiburg and Tübingen and Taiwan. Many years of teaching and lecturing in the basics of Analytical Psychology, Clinical Psychology and the “I Ching – Book of Changes”.

 

Ann Casement LP, is a Professor at the Oriental Academy for Analytical Psychology; senior member of the British Jungian Analytic Association; associate member of the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association (New York); New York State Licensed Psychoanalyst; member of the British Psychoanalytic Council; member of the National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis (New York); member of the British Psychological Society; founder member of the International Neuropsychoanalysis Society; and Patron of the Freud Museum in London. She worked for several years in psychiatry from the late 1970s; chaired the UK Council for Psychotherapy (1997-2001); served on the Executive Committee of the International Association for Analytical Psychology (2001-2007), and the IAAP Ethics Committee (2007-2016) becoming its Chair in 2010. For two years from 1999 she conducted research working with Lord Alderdice and other stakeholders in the profession on a Private Member’s Bill in the House of Lords on the statutory regulation of the psychotherapy/psychoanalytic profession. She has been teaching and lecturing in China starting in 2015 at the initial invitation of Professor Heyong Shen.

She has lectured, taught and supervised in various countries around the world, including the UK, China, Japan, Russia, USA, Canada, Israel, Lithuania, Switzerland, South Africa, Brazil, Mexico, and in many countries in Europe. She contributes to The Economist, and to psychoanalytic journals worldwide, being on the editorial board of some. She served on the Gradiva Awards Committee (New York) in 2013; gave the Fay Lecture in Texas in 2019; is a Fellow of The Royal Anthropological Institute; a Fellow of The Royal Society of Medicine; and was a member of the Council of the Metropolitan Opera in New York. She has produced many articles, reviews and several chapters for books. She has published the following eight books:

Post-Jungians Today (Routledge 1998).

Carl Gustav Jung (Sage 2001).

Who Owns Psychoanalysis? (Karnac 2004) nominated for the 2005 Gradiva Award.

The Idea of the Numinous (Routledge 2006) with David Tacey.

Who Owns Jung? (Karnac 2007).

Thresholds and Pathways Between Jung and Lacan, Routledge (2021) with Dany Nobus

and Phil Goss.

Jung: An Introduction (Phoenix Publishing House 2021).

Integrating Shadow: Authentic Being in the World (Texas A&M 2023).

 

Thomas Singer, M.D., is a psychiatrist and Jungian psychoanalyst who trained at Yale Medical School, Dartmouth Medical School, and the C. G. Jung Institute of San Francisco. He is the author of many books and articles that include a series of books on cultural complexes that have focused on Australia, Latin America, Europe, the United States, and Far East Asian countries, in addition to another series of books featuring Ancient Greece, Modern Psyche. He serves on the board of ARAS (Archive for Research into Archetypal Symbolism) and has edited ARAS Connections for many years.

 

Paul Bishop was born in 1967 in Southend-on-Sea. He studied at Magdalen College, Oxford, and he is currently William Jacks Chair of Modern Languages at the University of Glasgow. His books examine the history of ideas and the histories of psychoanalysis and analytical psychology, with particular emphasis on Nietzsche, C.G. Jung, and Ludwig Klages. He has edited Companion volumes for Camden House on Goethe’s Faust, Parts One and Two; and on the life and works of Nietzsche. Recently elected a Fellow of the Institute of Linguists, he also works as a translator. He enjoys walking, classical music, and reading, and is fascinated by the history and architecture of Glasgow. Under the username @paulbishop4U, he tweets about his interests in culture, politics, and economics.

 

Samuel L. Kimbles, Ph.D.

 

Andrew Samuels is a relational Jungian psychoanalyst, professor, author, political consultant and activist. He was the founder of Psychotherapists and Counsellors for Social Responsibility in the UK, and was the elected chair of the UK Council for Psychotherapy. Previously, Honorary Secretary of the International Association for Analytical Psychology. His books have been translated into 21 languages and include Jung and the Post-Jungians (1985), The Plural Psyche (1989), The Political Psyche (1993), Politics on the Couch (2001), Persons Passions, Psychotherapy Politics (2017), and A New Therapy for Politics? (2018).

General Information

Location

Hosted Online

Cancellations

Cancellations 14 days or more prior to the program start date receive a 100% refund of program registrations. After 14 days, up to 7 days prior to the program start date, a 50% refund is available. For cancellations made less than 7 days of program start date, no refund is available.

For additional information, including travel, cancellation policy, and disability services please visit our general information section.

Continuing Education Credit

This program meets qualifications for 14 hours of continuing education credit for Psychologists through the California Psychological Association (PAC014) Pacifica Graduate Institute is approved by the California Psychological Association to provide continuing education for psychologists.  Pacifica Graduate Institute maintains responsibility for this program and its content.  Full attendance is required to receive a certificate.

This course meets the qualifications for 14 hours of continuing education credit for LMFTs, LCSWs, LPCCs, and/or LEPs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences.  Pacifica Graduate Institute is approved by the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists (#60721) to sponsor continuing education for LMFTs, LCSWs, LPCCs, and/or LEPs.  Pacifica Graduate Institute maintains responsibility for this program/course and its content.  Full attendance is required to obtain a certificate.

For Registered Nurses through the California Board of Registered Nurses this conference meets qualifications of 14 hours of continuing education credit are available for RNs through the California Board of Registered Nurses (provider #CEP 7177).  Full attendance is required to obtain a certificate.

Pacifica Graduate Institute is approved by the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists to sponsor continuing education for LMFTs, LCSWs, LPCCs, and/or LEPs.  Pacifica Graduate Institute maintains responsibility for each program and its content.  Full day attendance is required to receive a certificate.

Continuing Education Goal.  Pacifica Graduate Institute is committed to offering continuing education courses to train LMFTs, LCSWs, LPCCs, and LEPs to treat any client in an ethically and clinically sound manner based upon current accepted standards of practice.  Course completion certificates will be awarded at the conclusion of the training and upon participant’s submission of his or her completed evaluation.

CECs and Online Program Attendance: Participants requesting Continuing Education Credits (CECs) for Online programs must attend all live sessions (offered via Zoom) in order to receive CECs. Please make sure that your Zoom account name matches the name of the attendee requesting CECs.

For additional information, including travel, cancellation policy, and disability services please visit our general information section.

Registration Details

April 20th – November 30th, 2024

Number of Classes: 14
Class Length: 1.5 Hours
Class Times: 8:00 – 9:30 AM PST
CECs: 14

Participants requesting Continuing Education Credits (CECs) for Online programs must attend all live sessions (offered via Zoom) in order to receive CECs. Please make sure that your Zoom account name matches the name of the attendee requesting CECs.

All of the live Zoom sessions will be recorded and made available to everyone registered for the program. If you watch the recordings and keep up with the online discussion forum you will qualify for the certificate of completion. Live attendance to the Zoom sessions is not necessary unless you are looking to obtain Continuing Education Credits.