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Advanced Ecotherapy
New Thinking, Best Practices and Emerging Modalities

August 8th – November 4th, 2023

3-month course | Offered Live via Zoom

Program Description

Ecotherapy is a rapidly growing field as increasing numbers of psychological and cultural leaders are inspired to address the urgent need for healing the wounded human-nature relationship. Exciting new ideas from theorists, therapists, researchers and educators are now expanding our perspectives and practices. This course will offer live online presentations by a stellar array of cutting-edge ecotherapy pioneers, spotlighting their latest thinking and work. Following these presentations, students can engage in live Q&A with these experts (which will also be recorded.) Additionally, students can attend live, online peer consultation groups facilitated by an ecotherapy specialist, each week to help them discuss and integrate their learnings.

This course is designed to inspire you to create or expand your own ecotherapy thinking and practice. By introducing you to the latest ideas from cutting-edge authors and practitioners, it will prepare you to address current challenges in the field and in your local and online personal and professional communities; create and present your own material; educate colleagues and students in your area and beyond; create and present your own innovative practices and publications.

What’s the difference between ecopsychology and ecotherapy?

Ecopsychology and ecotherapy are intimately connected with each other. Ecopsychology is the field that studies the relationship between the human psyche and the rest of nature in which it is embedded. It explores where, when and how this relationship degenerated in our era to its present disastrous condition – and how that might be remedied. Ecotherapy focuses on the practicalities of healing that relationship at both individual and collective levels.

The study of ecopsychology is critically important basic knowledge for ecotherapy practitioners; and deep nature-connection practices are core to the insights, research and philosophical-political understandings of ecopsychology.

We highly recommend that students interested in these topics consider taking advanced certificate courses in both fields.

Program Description

This unique program, offered online over 13 weeks, is taught by a stellar group of cutting-edge thinkers and practitioners in the rapidly evolving field of ecotherapy. Whether you are a licensed clinician or health care practitioner interested in expanding your current healing practice to include nature-connection therapies, or an educator, guide, coach, social worker, public health expert, artist or community activist, this extensive exploration of the latest thinking in ecotherapy will offer new approaches and creative ideas and activities to pursue. Ecotherapy focuses on the synergy between human well-being and the health of the planet, so this course also addresses the importance of the psychological and social justice issues raised by the rapidly degenerating human-nature relationship.

Because the practices and ideas of ecotherapy are open to everyone, this Certificate neither requires nor confers a license or degree. It will be of interest to everyone looking for a more holistic and engaged way forward. The Certificate offers a range of readings, lectures, weekly reflections, and live sessions, so participants will need to make sufficient space in their schedules to learn as much as they can over the 13 weeks.

Program Format

Each week you will learn from:

  • Spotlight Learning Sessions – 90 minute, live online Learning Sessions with cutting-edge ecotherapists and ecotherapy experts
  • Peer Consultation Sessions – 90 minute, live online group peer consultation sessions facilitated by an ecotherapy practitioner.
  • Online Written Discussion Forum – Share your thoughts, questions, resources with the other participants and instructors in this private, online forum
  • Recommended Readings/Videos/Resources

All live sessions will be recorded for those who cannot attend a given week. Assignments include indoor and outdoor exercises designed to deepen learning and enrich nature connection.

 

 

Live Expert Spotlight Learning Sessions Schedule

Tuesday Evenings, 5:00 – 6:30 PM PST/ 8:00 – 9:30 PM EST

You must attend all of the Expert Spotlight Learning Sessions on Tuesdays to be eligible to earn Continuing Education Credits. Attendance will be verified through Zoom logs. No partial CEC certificates will be issued.

Tues., August 8th, 2023
How Ecotherapy is Rapidly Evolving, Linda Buzzell

Tues. August 15th, 2023
The Latest Advances in Equine Facilitated Wellness, Kate Burns

Tues. August 22nd, 2023
Recovery from Eco-Narcissism, Jeanine Canty

Tues. August 29th, 2023
The Evolved Nest: Nature’s Wellness-Informed Approach to Living, Darcia Narvaez  

Tues. Sept. 5th, 2023
Beauty Might Just Save the Earth (or at Least Your Life on Earth), Trebbe Johnson  

Tues. Sept. 12th, 2023
Our Relationship with the Sacred, Pegi Eyers

Tues. Sept. 19th, 2023
How to Incorporate Ecotherapy into an Existing, Conventional Psychotherapy Practice,  Jen Udler 

Tues. Sept. 26th , 2023
The Earthy Imaginal: How Nature speaks to us through dreams, images and synchronicities, Lauren Schneider

Tues., Oct. 3rd, 2023

Reconnecting: Can psychedelics help humanity remember our place in the web of life? Rosalind Watts

Tues. Oct. 10th, 2023
Encountering “Ecological Emotions” and Eco-Anxiety, Panu Pihkala  

Tues. Oct. 17th,  2023
Community Ecopsychology: Moving Beyond Psychology’s Individualistic Focus, Carol Koziol

Tues. Oct. 24th, 2023
“Creating Spaces for Collective Healing”, LaUra Schmidt 

Tues. Oct. 31st 2023
Mary-Jayne Rust *This session will run from 9:00 – 10:30 AM due to international time zone of the presenter

 

Facilitated Peer Consultation Sessions Schedule

Sat., Aug. 12th, 2023 – Linda Buzzell (9:00 – 10:30 AM PST/Noon – 1:30 PM EST)

Sat., Aug. 19th, 2023 – Melissa Clews-Hunt (9:00 – 10:30 AM PST/Noon – 1:30 PM EST)

Sat., Aug. 26th, 2023 – Mary-Jayne Rust (9:00 – 10:30 AM PST/Noon – 1:30 PM EST)

Sat., Sept. 2nd, 2023 – Linda Buzzell (9:00 – 10:30 AM PST/Noon – 1:30 PM EST)

Sat. Sept. 9th, 2023 – Mary-Jayne Rust (10:00 – 11:30 AM PST/1:00 PM– 2:30 PM EST)

Sat., Sept. 16th, 2023 – Linda Buzzell (9:00 – 10:30 AM PST/Noon – 1:30 PM EST)

Sat., Sept. 23rd, 2023 – Melissa Clews-Hunt (9:00 – 10:30 AM PST/Noon – 1:30 PM EST)

Sat., Sept. 30th, 2023 – Mary-Jayne Rust (9:00 – 10:30 AM PST/Noon – 1:30 PM EST)

Sat., Oct. 7th, 2023 – Linda Buzzell (10:00 – 11:30 AM PST/1:00 PM– 2:30 PM EST)

Sat., Oct. 14th, 2023 – Melissa Clews-Hunt (9:00 – 10:30 AM PST/Noon – 1:30 PM EST)

Sat., Oct. 21st, 2023 – Mary-Jayne Rust (9:00 – 10:30 AM PST/Noon – 1:30 PM EST)

Sat., Oct. 28th, 2023 – Melissa Clews-Hunt (9:00 – 10:30 AM PST/Noon – 1:30 PM EST)

Sat., Nov. 4th, 2023 – Linda Buzzell (9:00 – 10:30 AM PST/Noon – 1:30 PM EST)

 

Learning Sessions Descriptions

August 8th – Linda Buzzell

How Ecotherapy is Rapidly Changing and Evolving

Until quite recently, many ecotherapies have focused primarily on developing practical, evidence-based tools to add to the healer’s toolbox – an important endeavor. The goal for many ecotherapists has been to create methods and protocols that can win acceptance by Western psychology and other existing healthcare, science, education and wellness systems. This approach has yielded some powerful healing innovations to enrich our ecotherapy practices, but unfortunately it has also too often been anthropocentric and even narcissistic, focused on “using” some aspect of the rest of nature to improve individual human wellbeing without much consideration for the health of whole communities and all life on Earth. In this presentation, we’ll explore some of the exciting trends that are now radically expanding and transforming the rapidly-growing field of ecotherapy.

Learning Objectives

  • Differentiate between Level 1 and Level 2 ecotherapies
  • Identify three new directions where ecotherapy is expanding

Suggested Readings

Buzzell, Linda and Craig Chalquist. 2023. From Eco-Anxiety to Eco-Resilience: Toward a Psychology of Care, in Eco-Anxiety and Pandemic Distress: Psychological Perspectives on Resilience and Interconnectedness, eds. Douglas A. Vakoch and Sam Mickey. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Smith, Phoenix, MSW. Ecotherapy and Social Justice. Ecopsychology Voices, Canadian Ecopsychology Network, April 7, 2021. https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=1177953819307306

Buzzell, Linda (2016). The Many Ecotherapies, Ecotherapy: Theory, Research & Practice, Martin Jordan & Joe Hinds, eds. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Buzzell, Linda and Craig Chalquist. (2009) Ecotherapy: Healing with Nature in Mind. San Francisco: Sierra Club Books.

Additional Readings/videos to be listed on D2L

Buzzell, Linda. The Climate Cassandra Syndrome. LinkedIn, 3/13/2023. https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/climate-cassandra-syndrome-linda-buzzell-ma-lmft

Buzzell, Linda. Is Climate Psychology a Form of Ecopsychology? LinkedIn, 2/6/23 https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/climate-psychology-form-ecopsychology-linda-buzzell-ma-lmft

Buzzell, Linda and Craig Chalquist. Ecotherapy and the Procrustean Bed, LinkedIn 2/1/23 https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/ecotherapy-procrustean-bed-linda-buzzell-ma-lmft

Buzzell, Linda (2022) Ecotherapy: Not just another tool in the therapy tool box! LinkedIn, July 15, 2022. https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/ecotherapy-just-another-tool-therapy-box-linda-buzzell-ma-lmft

Buzzell, Linda. Reciprocity in Ecotherapy (Level 1 & 2 Ecotherapies) Ecopsychology Voices, Canadian Ecopsychology Network, March 2018. https://vimeo.com/25491859

 

August 15th – Kate Burns, MSW

The Latest Advances in Equine Facilitated Wellness (EFW)

Over the last two decades there have been significant developments in EFW. Even the training to prepare certified practitioners has changed as a result of the pandemic. For example, “How to incorporate zoom without harming the integrity of the training?” Kate will outline some of the relational benefits of working with equines and nature and how those benefits extend beyond human-equine relationships. As well, Kate will share a few of the core underlying principles and intersecting theories that inform the work, and bring attention to some of the current challenges. Examples, from on-the-ground experiences will be included.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify at least one current challenge in Equine Facilitated Wellness
  • Integrate one Equine Facilitated Wellness practice into daily life or professional environment

Suggested Reading

Brown, Molly and Macy, Joanna, (2014). Coming Back to Life: The Updated Guide to The Work That Reconnects, Gabriola Island, BC, Canada: New Society Publishers.

Cohen, M. J. (2007). Reconnecting with Nature: Finding wellness through restoring your bond with the Earth.  Lakeville, Minnesota: Ecopress.

Dunning, Angela, (2017) The Horse Leads the Way: Honoring the True Role of the Horse in Equine Facilitated Practice, Oxford: Youcaxton Publications.

Hallberg, Leif (2018). The Clinical Practice of Equine-Assisted Therapy, New York: Routledge.

Porges, Stephen W., (2017). The Pocket Guide to the Polyvagal Theory: the Transformative Power of Feeling Safe

Wall Kimmerer, Robin, (2015). Braiding Sweet Grass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants.

 

August 22nd – Jeanine Canty, Ph.D.

Recovery from Eco-Narcissism.

As so many of us are realizing the therapeutic benefits of spending time in nature, we are also recognizing that Earth needs our support in healing. The climate crisis is causing unfathomable destruction to the Earth, and it is human caused.  Why is our society so complicit and what can we do to break this pattern?  In this session, professor and author Jeanine M. Canty will speak to themes in her latest book, Returning the Self to Nature: Undoing Our Collective Narcissism and Healing Our Planet, unraveling collective narcissism and looking at ways to mend our disconnections and move towards healing.

Learning Objectives: 

  • Assess collective narcissism and identify three ways it affects Earth and all beings.
  • Evaluate two ways to heal our collective narcissism.

Suggested Readings: 

Returning the Self to Nature: Undoing Our Collective Narcissism and Healing Our Planet 

My Name is Chellis and I’m in Recovery from Western Civilization 

Coming Back to Life: The Updated Guide to the Work That Reconnects 

 

August 29th – Darcia Narvaez, Ph.D.

The Evolved Nest: Nature’s Wellness-Informed Approach to Living

The Evolved Nest was shaped over generations to build our health and wellbeing. All evolved nest characteristics are linked to health in mammalian and human studies. But industrialized capitalist societies shifted away from the evolved nest impairing psychosocial and neurobiological wellbeing in children and adults. Learning about the evolved nest is the first step towards restoring our own and our children’s birthrights. This knowledge can influence us as individuals, family and community members, practitioners, and policymakers. It provides a blueprint for growing children’s wellness but also to growing and maintaining health throughout life.  Ongoing experience of the evolved nest throughout life supports physiological regulation of stress, endocrine, and immune systems. It supports psychological wellbeing through relational attunement to others, including the rest of the natural world. It increases a sense of peacefulness, centeredness, and wholeness. When you are calm and connected, you are better able to listen and be present to others. Your self-regulation passes on your calmness to others, whether your children, friends, family members, co-workers or strangers.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the components of humanity’s evolved nest.
  • Determine at least two ways to self-nest themselves and children.

Suggested Reading

Darcia Narvaez ‘Growing children and adults: What does species typicality look like?’ https://culturico.com/2021/04/24/growing-children-and-adults-what-does-species-typicality-look-like/ 

Mary Tarsha and D Narvaez ‘The Evolved Nest: A partnership system that fosters child wellbeing’ https://pubs.lib.umn.edu/index.php/ijps/article/view/2244

 

September 5th – Trebbe Johnson

Beauty Might Just Save the Earth (or at Least Your Life on Earth)

Moments of beauty can pierce even the most tragic of circumstances and the most desecrated of places. When that happens—more specifically, when we actually allow it to happen—we realize that life, meaning, and even joy, if not imminent, are at least imaginable. As we cope individually and collectively with the ramifications of climate change and all the other ecological assaults in our midst, finding and making beauty in and for challenged places will become increasingly important. We discover that acts of beauty in hurt places bring communities together, give us agency and creativity in hard times, and enfold us more deeply into the whole of life on this aching and achingly beautiful planet.

Learning Objectives

  • Explain the value of brining beauty to hurt places, both as an act unto itself and as part of other forms of activism
  • Identify two simple and effective ways to “attend the Earth” by bringing attention and beauty to hurt places

Suggested Readings

Books:

Trebbe Johnson, Radical Joy for Hard Times: Finding Meaning and Making Beauty in Earth’s Broken Places, 2018

Trebbe Johnson, Fierce Consciousness: Surviving the Sorrows of Earth and Self, 2023

Articles:

Uncommon Gratitude,” Orion, 2015

Gaze Even Here,” Orion, 2012 (no longer available online)

Guerrilla Beauty,” Humans and Nature

Gifts for Broken Places,” Ecopsychology, 2014

 

September 12th – Pegi Eyers

Our Relationship with the Sacred

It is essential for all people today to restore our bonds with nature as the ground of our being, and the source of our healing and spiritual life. And yet, there are ethics and protocols to consider. How do we learn “best practices” on Turtle Island, adopt an attitude of respect and humility, and engage with social justice issues?  This session by Pegi Eyers will touch on cultural sensitivity in terms of good allyship with First Nations, how to avoid cultural appropriation, and how our own ethnocultural recovery can play a part in nature immersion. We have inherited a society full of discord and crisis, and at the core of our work is the challenge to shift our patterns of western thinking to the wholeness of ancestral mind.  The animist worldview offers a direct interface with nature, aligns us with the sacred in each other and Earth Community, and inspires us to find authenticity in our mythopoetic expressions of art, ritual and ceremonies on the land.

Learning Objectives

  • Assess the ongoing dialogues on Settler-Colonialism and cultural appropriation to identify at least three questions and concerns regarding honoring of boundaries, intercultural competencies and peaceful coexistence.
  • Acquire awareness of reconciliation work and reparations and explain the Indigenous Knowledge of our bioregion as an important foundation for our own relationship to the natural world.
  • Identify how the land itself informs our healing practices for self and community.

Suggested Readings:

Books:

Pegi Eyers, Ancient Spirit Rising: Reclaiming Your Roots & Restoring Earth Community, Stone Circle Press, 2016

Arthur Manuel, The Reconciliation Manifesto, Lorimer Press, 2017

Melissa K. Nelson, (editor), Original Instructions: Indigenous Teachings for a Sustainable Future,  Bear & Company, 2008

Articles:

“What is Cultural Appropriation?” by Pegi Eyers, Stone Circle Press

https://www.stonecirclepress.com/blog-9658-ancient-spirit-rising/what-is-cultural-appropriation

“The Interbeing of Animism” by Pegi Eyers, Deep Times Journal, the Work that Reconnects (WTR)

https://journal.workthatreconnects.org/2023/02/22/the-interbeing-of-animism

 

September 19th – Jennifer Udler, LCSW

How to Incorporate Ecotherapy into an Existing, Conventional Psychotherapy Practice.

Author of new book Walk and Talk Therapy: A Clinician’s Guide to Incorporating Movement and Nature into Your Practice.

As the walk and talk therapy movement gains momentum, therapists are intrigued, and clients are signing up! What is walk and talk? What makes it an enriching and inspiring way to practice? And, what are the critical pieces to learn before heading outdoors with a client? In this workshop, you’ll discover how seasonal changes, landscapes, and shared interactions can be harnessed to provide positive therapeutic experiences

Learning objectives:

  • Evaluate the research and evidence showing the benefits of walking therapy.
  • Explain how to incorporate movement and nature into an effective therapy session.

Suggested reading:

“Walk and Talk Therapy” by, Jennifer Udler Walk and Talk Therapy (pesi.com)

Journal article: ‘Into the Wild’: A meta-synthesis of talking therapy in natural outdoor spaces – ScienceDirect

September 26th – Lauren Schneider, LMFT

The Earthy Imaginal: How Nature speaks to us through dreams, images and synchronicities.

Just as trees communicate through roots, electrical signals and airwaves, nature communicates to us through its web of connectivity. When ego is asleep or has stepped aside from its linear, rational dominance, dreams, ritual practices with imagery, and synchronicity are ways to pay attention to nature’s communication. The closer we are to the imaginal realm – working with dreams and imagery – the more transparent we are to nature’s intelligence, and the less attached to personal and collective ego constructs. When overwhelmed by circumstances, dreams and imagery can help us navigate the collective and personal landscape of loss and grief, and guide us to find resilience and renewal in the midst of heartbreak. This work engages a non-rational perspective and invites the extraordinary experience of synchronicity to deepen our connectedness to something beyond our human-centered myopia. Synchronicity is a healing moment, a glitch in the matrix that breaks through our illusion of separation and engenders a greater sense of wholeness in which psyche and nature are intrinsically connected.

Learning Objectives: 

  • Identify the presence of ecological and non-ordinary intelligences in dreams and imagery.
  • Acquire the following techniques to connect with dream and symbolic imagery: dialoging with images through active imagination, automatic writing, and Embodied Imagination.
  • Specify at least three of benefits of synchronicity.

Suggested Readings:

Carroll, M. M. (2014) Advancing an Ecocentric Perspective Through Phenomenological Engagement with the Imaginal Realm. [Master’s thesis, Pacifica Graduate Institute; Academia. edu.]

Schneider, L. Z. (2009) “Eco-dreaming: The Whale’s Tale” (pp. 116-122). Buzzell, L., & Chalquist, C. Healing with Nature in Mind. San Francisco, CA: Sierra Club Books

Schneider, L.Z. (2021) Tarotpy – It’s All in the Cards. Los Angeles, CA: New Insights Press

Sheikh, A.A. (2017) Healing Images: The Role of Imagination in Health (Imagery and Human Development Series). New York, NY: Routledge

 

October 3rd – Dr. Rosalind Watts

Reconnecting: Can psychedelics help humanity remember our place in the web of life?

This session will look at recent research showing that psychedelic use can strengthen our sense of connectedness to Self, others and the living world, and indeed can induce nature connectedness so powerful that we can call it biophilia.

But psychedelics are powerful tools, and to have a positive impact, they must be administered within a steady, caring and ethical container.   We will cover the basics of psychedelic therapy in both the medical and ceremonial settings, and consider the importance of community based psychedelic integration initiatives, in order to ground the potential of psychedelics in deeply rooted and sustainable systems of care.

How can nature contact be included in psychedelic integration, to help maintain the sense of connectedness that so many experience in their trips? We will look at the ACER Integration model (Accept, Connect, Embody, Restore) which focuses on the metaphor of the interrelated forest as a blueprint for building mycelial networks of support to help people maintain the benefits of psychedelics. Can psychedelics, when paired with such community initiatives, help people become agents of connectedness, advocates of the web of life? Can altered states lead to transformed ecosystems?

Learning Objectives:

  • Evaluate research suggesting that therapeutic psychedelic use can boost nature connectedness.
  • Explain the construct of ‘Connectedness to Self, Others, and Wider World’ and how it emerged from psychedelic research.
  • Assess how the potential powerful synergy between psychedelics, nature contact, and connectedness might be safely harnessed to bring positive change.

Reading:

Gandy S, Forstmann M, Carhart-Harris RL, Timmermann C, Luke D, Watts R. (2020) The potential synergistic effects between psychedelic administration and nature contact for the improvement of mental health. Health Psychology Open 7(2).

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2055102920978123

Irvine A, LukeD, Harrild F, Gandy S, Watts R  (2023).  Transpersonal Ecodelia: Surveying Psychedelically Induced Biophilia. Psychoactives.

https://doi.org/10.3390/psychoactives2020012

Paterniti, K., Bright, S., & Gringart, E. (2022). The Relationship Between Psychedelic Use, Mystical Experiences, and Pro-Environmental Behaviors. Journal of Humanistic Psychology 0(0).

The Relationship Between Psychedelic Use, Mystical Experiences, and Pro-Environmental Behaviors – Kelly Paterniti, Stephen Bright, Eyal Gringart, 2022 (sagepub.com)

Amber X. Chen, Aaron L. Denton (2023).

Tripping for the Planet: Psychedelics and Climate Activism. Atmos.

Tripping for the Planet: Psychedelics and Climate Activism | Atmos

Louis Sahagún (2020). Why are some Native Americans fighting efforts to decriminalize peyote? Los Angeles Times. Why are some Native Americans fighting efforts to decriminalize peyote?

 

October 10th – Panu Pikhala, Ph.D.

Encountering “Ecological Emotions” and Eco-Anxiety.

Environmental issues can evoke a profound array of emotions and feelings. Some of these have received growing attention, such as “eco-anxiety” and “ecological grief”, while others have remained much in the shade. In this session, interdisciplinary eco-emotion scholar and workshop leader Panu Pihkala from Finland will discuss many different ecological emotions and ways to encounter them constructively. Pihkala will also present his recent Process model of eco-anxiety and grief, and discuss how it could be used in various ecotherapeutic encounters. Discerning different phases and dimensions can help to support people in their journeys amidst the ecological crisis.

Learning objectives

  • Explain the processes of eco-anxiety and grief using a new model.
  • Evaluate the growing array of emotions related to environmental issues.
  • Determine how their own skills and knowledge can be applied to constructive engagement with ecological emotions.

Suggested readings

“How to take breaks from the climate crisis without living in denial: A conversation with Dr. Panu Pihkala”, Gen Dread website (Britt Wray & co.) 2023, https://gendread.substack.com/p/how-to-take-breaks-from-the-climate

Pihkala, Panu. 2022. “The Process of Eco-Anxiety and Ecological Grief: A Narrative Review and a New Proposal.” Sustainability 14 (24, https://doi.org/10.3390/su142416628

Pihkala, Panu. 2022. “Toward a Taxonomy of Climate Emotions.” Frontiers in Climate 3. https://doi.org/10.3389/fclim.2021.738154

 

October 17th – Carol Koziol, Ph.D.

Community Ecopsychology: Moving Beyond Psychology’s Individualistic Focus.

Community Ecopsychology is an emerging approach connecting groups of people
with all communities of life, human and more-than-human. Connecting to larger communities of life
with the intention to empower and improve some aspect of life, both individual and collective health is improved.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify and expand upon the concept of community.
  • Explain the idea of an Ecopsychological Sense of Community.
  • Assess at least two aspects of Community Ecopsychology.

Suggested Reading:
Fisher, A. (2013). Radical Ecopsychology: Psychology in the Service of Life (Second edition). State
University of New York Press.
Kałużna-Wielobób, A., Strus, W., & Cieciuch, J. (2020). Community Feeling and Narcissism as Two
Opposite Phenomena. Frontiers in Psychology, 11.
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.515895/full
Koziol, C. (2022). Community Ecopsychology: Widening Connections to Catalyze Change. Ecopsychology.
14(1), 1-7. http://doi.org/10.1089/eco.2021.0026
Naidoo, A. V., Zygmont, C., & Philips, S. (2017). Harnessing the Power of Ecopsychology in Community
Work. In M. Seedat, S. Suffla, & D. J. Christie (Eds.), Emancipatory and Participatory
Methodologies in Peace, Critical, and Community Psychology, 77–89. Springer International
Publishing.

 

October 24th – Laura Schmidt

Dealing with Eco-Grief and Climate Trauma.

“Creating Spaces for Collective Healing”

The climate crisis is one of disconnection. Any movement toward healing requires deep reconnection: with ourselves, each other, and the more-than-human world. We’ll explore how coming together in intimate community groups helps us process painful feelings, build mutual aid, allowing us to better be with uncertainty and open our imagination to cocreate truly just and life-supporting cultures.

Two learning objectives:

  • Identify the importance of community spaces for healing and connection in uncertain times.
  • Assess the importance of being with uncertainty in an ever-changing world.

Suggested Reading:

  • How to Live in a Chaotic Climate: 10 Steps to Reconnect with Ourselves, Our Communities, & Our Planet (Shambhala Publications), Released August 8, 2023
  • Change Is Coming, Whether You Like It Or Not” An Earth Day talk by LaUra Schmidt

October 31st – Mary-Jayne Rust

Ecopsychotherapy

Psychotherapy understands trauma and healing within human relationships. Ecopsychotherapy expands the frame to include our relationships with the rest of life. Some examples of how this manifests in sessions might include: grieving a much-loved animal companion or place in

childhood; facing eco-anxiety or eco-grief; exploring relationships with the other-than-human in dreams; exploring ancestral relationships with Nature; reconnecting with our embodied, creaturely self. Through these explorations we slowly piece together our earth stories. In this session we

will explore these many layers. This is an emerging field which raises questions such as: does ecopsychotherapy need to be differentiated from other forms of ecotherapy? There is much research to show that taking therapy outdoors is beneficial – but does the practice of ecopsychotherapy

depend on an outdoor setting? What are the pros and cons of outdoor/indoor practice?

Learning Objectives

  • Identify and evaluate your earth story.
  • Identifying the difference between ecopsychotherapy, psychotherapy and the multiple forms of ecotherapy.
  • Determine three factors in the decision to practice outdoors or indoors.

Reading:

Rust, M. J. (2020) Towards an Ecopsychotherapy Confer Books

Peters, R. (1987) The Eagle and the Serpent Journal of Analytical Psychology available online here https://www.roderickpeters.info/publications/

 

Further reading for your interest:

Brazier, C. (2018) Ecotherapy in Practice: A Buddhist Model. NY: Routledge.

Jordan, M. (2014) Nature and Therapy: Understanding Psychotherapy and Counselling in Outdoor Spaces. Routledge.

Linden, S. & Grut, J. (2002) The Healing Fields. London: Frances Lincoln.

Totton, N. (2011) Wild Therapy. PCCS Books.

 

Program Details

Dates

August 8th, 2023  – November 4th, 2023

Online 3 Month certificate course

26 Live Online sessions

International participation is encouraged and welcome.

 

Registration Fees

  • $695.00 – Pacifica Student Rate
  • $895.00 – Pacifica Alumni, Full Time Students, & Senior Rate
  • $1095.00 – General Rate
  • $30 – Continuing Education Credits (13 CEC Hours)

Participants requesting Continuing Education Credits (CECs) for Online programs must attend all live sessions (offered via Zoom) in order to receive CECs. Please make sure that your Zoom account name matches the name of the attendee requesting CECs.

All of the live Zoom sessions will be recorded and made available to everyone registered for the program. If you watch the recordings and keep up with the online discussion forum you will qualify for the certificate of completion. Live attendance to the Zoom sessions is not necessary unless you are looking to obtain Continuing Education Credits.

 

About the Teachers

Linda BuzzellLinda Buzzell, LMFT – has been a psychotherapist for more than 40 years and has specialized in ecopsychology and ecotherapy since 2000. She and Craig Chalquist edited the Sierra Club Books anthology Ecotherapy: Healing with Nature in Mind, a core text in clinical ecopsychology. She is a member of the editorial board of Ecopsychology, the peer-reviewed journal of the field. Linda is Adjunct Faculty at Pacifica Graduate Institute, where she taught Pacifica’s Ecotherapy Certificate program in 2015. She was a featured presenter with Joanna Macy at Holos Institute’s 2017 Ecopsychology Conference in Petaluma, CA and at the 2014 Ecotherapy Symposium at the University of Brighton in the UK. In 2002 she founded The International Association for Ecotherapy and edited its journal Ecotherapy News for many years. She blogged on ecopsychology and ecotherapy for 7 years at Huffington Post and is an Admin on the 7500+ Facebook group “Ecopsychology.”

Melissa Clews-HuntMelissa Clews-Hunt, MSc, RP, RMFT-SM, is an Individual, Couple and Family Therapist & Clinical Supervisor. (Pronouns: she/her). Melissa runs her private practice Healing Spaces Therapy in Guelph, Ontario. She is a Registered Psychotherapist in Ontario, and is both a Registered Marriage and Family Therapist and an Approved Supervisor & Supervisor Mentor with CAMFT (Canadian Association for Marriage and Family Therapy). In addition to her clinical training and experience, her specialty is including nature in the work. For some that could be addressing eco anxiety concerns, for some that could be having a phone session while walking in a forest. For over 14 years Melissa has been providing clinical supervision to therapists, and has been a therapist herself for over 17 years. She brings her warmth, intelligence, open-mindedness, and creativity into this work. Melissa is an outdoor enthusiast and a proud mom of two children.

Kate BurnsKate Burns, MSW, is a registered social worker with over 30 years experience of collaborating with people through counselling, facilitating groups and workshops, teaching and mentoring. Kate first incorporated a nature component into her work in the 1980s, and her relational orientation to the rest of nature has never stopped. Kate began to work with equines in 2008, became a certified EFW practitioner, and then mentor. For the past 15 years she has enjoyed contributing to the development and facilitation of a variety of EFW workshops, including co-facilitating the training of future certified EFW practitioners.

Darcia NarvaezDarcia Narvaez, Ph.D.  is a Professor of Psychology Emerita at the University of Notre Dame. She is the founder of the public and professional educational outreach project The Evolved Nest Initiative whose nonprofit mission is to share her science research into developing appropriate baselines for lifelong human wellness by meeting the biological needs of infants. Darcia is the current president of the award-winning, venerable nonprofit Kindred World, who has been “serving the re-generation since 1996.” The Evolved Nest is an initiative of Kindred World. In 2022, Narvaez was elected a fellow to the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the largest international body of professional scientists in the world and publisher of the prestigious journal Science. Narvaez was honored for her distinguished contributions illuminating typical and atypical development in terms of well-being, morality and sustainable wisdom.

Jeanine M CantyJeanine Canty, Ph.D., is author of Returning the Self to Nature: Undoing our Collective Narcissism and Healing Our Planet and a professor within the Transformative Studies Doctoral program at the California Institute of Integral Studies (CIIS) in San Francisco. Previously, she was a professor of Environmental Studies at Naropa University, and started her teaching career as a core faculty at Prescott College, an experiential learning institution, and still guest teaches at both institutions.  She has a doctorate in Transformative Learning and Change from CIIS, a MA in Cultural Ecopsychology from Prescott College, and a BA from Colgate University in International Relations.  A lover of nature, justice, and contemplative practice, her teaching intersects issues of social and ecological justice connected to the process of worldview expansion and positive change. She is both editor and a contributor to the book Ecological and Social Healing: Multicultural Women’s Voices as well as Globalism and Localization: Emergent Approaches to Ecological and Social Crises.  Jeanine is also a certified meditation instruction as well as a Wilderness First Responder (WFR).

Trebbe JohnsonTrebbe Johnson is an author and frequent speaker on the relationship between people and nature. Her Latest book is: Fierce Consciousness: Surviving the Sorrows of Earth and Self. Her Most well-known book is: Radical Joy for Hard Times: Finding Meaning and Making Beauty in Earth’s Wounded Places. Her previous books are The World Is a Waiting Lover; 101 Ways to Make Guerrilla Beauty, and she has won many awards, including the John Masefield Award from the Poetry Society of America and a Telly Award for a video made for the UN on the 20th anniversary of Earth Day. She has led workshops, retreats, and rites of passage programs internationally since 1995, such as a retreat in an old-growth clear-cut forest, a ceremony at Ground Zero after September 11, and a walk in weapons testing grounds at Eglin Air Force Base. In 2009, Johnson founded the non-profit organization Radical Joy for Hard Times, dedicated to finding and making beauty in wounded places. She regularly speaks at a variety of events, from the Stephens College Commencement to the Parliament of the World’s Religions to the Sierra Club. Johnson is a contributing editor at Parabola Magazine and an active member of the Wilderness Guides Council, the Florence Shelly Stewardship Committee, and SCAN (Susquehanna Clean Air Network).

Pegi Eyers Pegi Eyers is the author of the award-winning book Ancient Spirit Rising: Reclaiming Your Roots & Restoring Earth Community, a survey on social justice, uncolonization, nature spirituality, sacred land, the ancestral arts and the holistic principles of sustainable living. Pegi self-identifies as a Celtic Animist, and is an advocate for the recovery of authentic ancestral wisdom and traditions for all people.  She lives in the countryside on the outskirts of Nogojiwanong in Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg territory (Peterborough, Ontario, Canada), on a hilltop with views reaching for miles in all directions. www.stonecirclepress.com

Jennifer Udler Jennifer Udler is a licensed clinical social worker in Maryland and Washington, DC. She is the founder of Positive Strides Therapy, a practice that incorporates walking with talk therapy.  She has over 21 years of experience treating children, adolescents, and adults. Jennifer specializes in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, mindfulness, and supportive counseling.  Jennifer’s experience includes working with children and adults with anxiety, depression, and ADHD. She has presented at the Psychotherapy Networker Symposium, Leading Edge Seminars of Canada, Innovations in Psychotherapy Conference, National Walking Summit, been featured in The Washington Post, The Psychotherapy Networker Magazine, Sirius XM radio, Outside Magazine, and was a guest writer for the National Recreation and Park Association.

Lauren Z SchneiderLauren Z. Schneider, Since 1983, Lauren Z. Schneider, LMFT (Santa Barbara, CA) has integrated family systems, hypnotherapy, ecotherapy, dreamwork and her pioneering method, Tarotpy® into short-term depth psychotherapy. In addition to individual consultations, Lauren facilitates workshops and on-going groups for healing practitioners and laypersons; and as a CAMFT approved CE provider offers trainings in Tarotpy and dreamwork. Her chapter, “Eco-Dreaming: The Whale’s Tale”, was published in Ecotherapy: Healing with Nature in Mind and her multi-award-winning book, Tarotpy: It’s All in the Cards, offers innovative perspectives and tools for clinicians and clients.

Rosalind WattsDr. Rosalind Watts is a clinical psychologist and the founder of ACER Integration. Her contributions to the field of psychedelic therapy are numerous and include the development of the the ACE model ‘Accept, Connect, Embody’, which has been used in clinical trials of both psilocybin and DMT, as well as the Watts Connectedness Scale, which is a psychometric tool for measuring outcomes of psychedelic therapy. Dr Watts is the former clinical lead on the Psilocybin for Depression trial at Imperial College London, and sits on the clinical advisory board of the Usona Institute.

Panu PikhalaPanu Pikhala, Ph.D. (b. 1979, he/his) is an adjunct professor of environmental theology (Title of Docent) at the University of Helsinki. He is currently known as a leading expert in interdisciplinary eco-anxiety research. In 2021, Pihkala was the third author in the research article “Climate anxiety in children and young people and their beliefs about government responses to climate change: a global survey” (Hickman et al., Lancet), which gained worldwide attention. Pihkala is the author of several books about eco-emotions in Finnish and he has received many awards in Finland for his work with eco-anxiety. He hosts a podcast “Climate Change and Happiness” with pioneering environmental psychologist Thomas Doherty, and leads workshops on eco-emotions.

Carol KoziolCarol Koziol, Ph.D., is a Work That Reconnects Facilitator, a Team Coach and Community Consultant, a Social Permaculturalist, and a former Environmental Studies Lecturer at Laurentian University. In 2015 she/her founded the Canadian Ecopsychology Network.

 

 

 

LaUra SchmidtLaUra Schmidt, is the founder of the Good Grief Network and the brain behind the “10-Steps to Resilience & Empowerment in a Chaotic Climate” program and the FLOW Facilitation Training modality. She is a lifelong student, curator, and practitioner of personal and collective resilience strategies. LaUra holds a BS in Environmental Studies, Biology, and Religious Studies and an MS in Environmental Humanities. LaUra has earned certificates in “Integrative Somatic Trauma Therapy” and “Climate Psychology.” LaUra’s book on eco-distress, How to Live in a Chaotic Climate: 10 Steps to Reconnect with Ourselves, Our Communities, and Our Planet, will be released in August 2023.

Mary-JaneMary-Jayne Rust is a psychotherapist of 40yrs experience, inspired by trainings in art therapy, feminist psychotherapy and Jungian analysis. Journeys to Ladakh (on the Tibetan plateau) in the early 1990’s alerted her to the seriousness of the ecological crisis and its cultural, economic and spiritual roots. This led her into the field of ecopsychology which has been the focus of her teaching and writing ever since. Her numerous publications can be found on www.mjrust.net, including Towards an Ecopsychotherapy, Confer Books, London 2019 and Vital Signs: Psychological Responses to Ecological Crisis. Eds M.J. Rust & Nick Totton. Karnac, London 2011. She grew up beside the sea and is wild about swimming. Now she lives and works beside ancient woodland in Nth London where she has both an indoor and outdoor ecopsychotherapy practice.

General Information

Location

Hosted Online

Cancellations

Cancellations 14 days or more prior to the program start date receive a 100% refund of program registrations. After 14 days, up to 7 days prior to the program start date, a 50% refund is available. For cancellations made less than 7 days of program start date, no refund is available.

For additional information, including travel, cancellation policy, and disability services please visit our general information section.

Continuing Education Credit

This program meets qualifications for 13 hours of continuing education credit for Psychologists through the California Psychological Association (PAC014) Pacifica Graduate Institute is approved by the California Psychological Association to provide continuing education for psychologists.  Pacifica Graduate Institute maintains responsibility for this program and its content.  Full attendance is required to receive a certificate.

This course meets the qualifications for 13 hours of continuing education credit for LMFTs, LCSWs, LPCCs, and/or LEPs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences.  Pacifica Graduate Institute is approved by the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists (#60721) to sponsor continuing education for LMFTs, LCSWs, LPCCs, and/or LEPs.  Pacifica Graduate Institute maintains responsibility for this program/course and its content.  Full attendance is required to obtain a certificate.

For Registered Nurses through the California Board of Registered Nurses this conference meets qualifications of 13 hours of continuing education credit are available for RNs through the California Board of Registered Nurses (provider #CEP 7177).  Full attendance is required to obtain a certificate.

Pacifica Graduate Institute is approved by the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists to sponsor continuing education for LMFTs, LCSWs, LPCCs, and/or LEPs.  Pacifica Graduate Institute maintains responsibility for each program and its content.  Full day attendance is required to receive a certificate.

Continuing Education Goal.  Pacifica Graduate Institute is committed to offering continuing education courses to train LMFTs, LCSWs, LPCCs, and LEPs to treat any client in an ethically and clinically sound manner based upon current accepted standards of practice.  Course completion certificates will be awarded at the conclusion of the training and upon participant’s submission of his or her completed evaluation.

CECs and Online Program Attendance: Participants requesting Continuing Education Credits (CECs) for Online programs must attend all live sessions (offered via Zoom) in order to receive CECs. Please make sure that your Zoom account name matches the name of the attendee requesting CECs.

All of the live Zoom sessions will be recorded and made available to everyone registered for the program. If you watch the recordings and keep up with the online discussion forum you will qualify for the certificate of completion. Live attendance to the Zoom sessions is not necessary unless you are looking to obtain Continuing Education Credits.

You must attend all of the Expert Spotlight Learning Sessions on Tuesdays to be eligible to earn Continuing Education Credits. Attendance will be verified through Zoom logs. No partial CEC certificates will be issued.

For additional information, including travel, cancellation policy, and disability services please visit our general information section.

Registration Details

August 8th – November 4th, 2023

Number of Classes:26
13 Expert Spotlight Learning Sessions
13 Facilitated Peer Consultation Sessions

Class Length:
Expert Spotlight Learning Sessions – 90 Minutes
Live Facilitated Peer Consultation Sessions – 90 Minutes

Class Times:
Tuesday Evenings 5:00 – 6:30 PST/8:00 – 9:30 EST
Saturday Mornings 9:00 – 10:30 AM PST/Noon – 1:30 PM EST

CECs:13

Participants requesting Continuing Education Credits (CECs) for Online programs must attend all live sessions (offered via Zoom) in order to receive CECs. Please make sure that your Zoom account name matches the name of the attendee requesting CECs.

All of the live Zoom sessions will be recorded and made available to everyone registered for the program. If you watch the recordings and keep up with the online discussion forum you will qualify for the certificate of completion. Live attendance to the Zoom sessions is not necessary unless you are looking to obtain Continuing Education Credits.